The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: Concise Volume B – Third Edition
The Age of Romanticism - The Victorian Era - The Twentieth Century and Beyond
  • Publication Date: January 15, 2019
  • ISBN: 9781554814374 / 1554814375
  • 1700 pages; 7¾" x 9¼"
Exam Copy

Availability: Canada & the US

The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: Concise Volume B – Third Edition

The Age of Romanticism - The Victorian Era - The Twentieth Century and Beyond

  • Publication Date: January 15, 2019
  • ISBN: 9781554814374 / 1554814375
  • 1700 pages; 7¾" x 9¼"

The Broadview Anthology of British Literature presents British literature in a truly distinctive light. Fully grounded in sound literary and historical scholarship, the anthology features an extraordinarily wide-ranging canon, with close attention paid throughout to issues such as race, gender, class, and sexual orientation. It offers a fuller range of contextual materials than any competing anthology, including extensive illustrations throughout each volume. The introductions to authors and periods are superb and comprehensive, and annotations provide the information students need without interfering with their interpretation of the text. Innovative, authoritative, and comprehensive, The Broadview Anthology of British Literature has established itself as a leader in the field.

In addition to the full six-volume anthology, the Broadview Anthology is available in two condensed forms: a two-volume Concise edition (about 3600 pages total) and a single-volume Compact version (2100 pages). All versions of the anthology are accompanied by an extensive website component that includes hundreds of additional readings and other interactive material. The website content has been edited, annotated, and designed according to the same high standards as the bound book component of the anthology, and can be accessed using the passcode obtained with the purchase of one or more of the bound volumes.

Features New to the Third Edition

  • — New longer texts including Dickens’s performance reading of “David Copperfield,” Gaskell’s The Manchester Marriage, Stevenson’s Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and Beckett’s Endgame
  • — New short selections from longer works including Eliot’s Middlemarch, Shelley’s Frankenstein, Barrett Browning’s Aurora Leigh, and Tennyson’s In Memoriam A.H.H.
  • — New bound-book author entries for Dorothy Wordsworth, John Clare, Emily Brontë, Thomas de Quincey, Walter Pater, Isaac Rosenberg, Tomson Highway, Derek Walcott, Jeanette Winterson, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  • — New selections representing “Literary Currents in Ireland, Scotland, and Wales in the Long Nineteenth Century”
  • — New “Contexts” section on “Gothic Literature” including materials by Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, and Jane Austen
  • — “Literature, Politics, and Cultural Identity” section includes numerous new authors and pieces, including work by Sorely MacLean, James Kelman, Gillian Clarke, Kamau Brathwaite, Kim Moore, and Warsan Shire

Comments

Comments on The Broadview Anthology of British Literature

“… an exciting achievement … it sets a new standard by which all other anthologies of British literature will now have to be measured.” – Graham Hammill, University of Notre Dame

“… I have been using The Broadview Anthology of British Literature for three years now. I love it—and so do my students! I’ll say too that the support for instructors is excellent.” – Martha Stoddard-Holmes, University of California, San Marcos

“… an excellent anthology. Good selections (including some nice surprises), just the right level of annotation, affordable—and a hit with my students. I will definitely use it again.” – Ira Nadel, University of British Columbia

“With the publication of the The Broadview Anthology of British Literature, teachers and students in survey and upper-level undergraduate courses have a compelling alternative to the established anthologies by Norton and Longman. Having adopted the first two volumes for an early period survey course last year, I had no hesitation in repeating the experience this year. The medieval volume, in particular, is superb, with its generous representation of Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman literary culture, as well as its growing collection of texts from the too little-known fifteenth century. This is a very real intellectual, as well as pedagogical, achievement.” – Nicholas Watson, Harvard University

Note: asterisks appear below to indicate material that is new to this volume or is appearing in the bound book portion of the volume for the first time.

INTRODUCTION TO THE AGE OF ROMANTICISM
Political Parties and Royal Allegiances
Imperial Expansion
The Romantic Mind and Its Literary Productions
The Business of Literature
“Romantic”
A Changing Language

HISTORY OF THE LANGUAGE AND OF PRINT CULTURE

ANNA LAETITIA BARBAULD

CHARLOTTE SMITH

  • from Elegiac Sonnets
    • 1 (“The partial Muse, has from my earliest hours”)
    • 2 Written at the Close of Spring
    • 11 To Sleep
    • 39 To Night
    • 44 Written in the Church-yard at Middleton in Sussex
    • 59 Written September 1791
    • 70 On being cautioned against walking on an headland overlooking the sea
    • 74 The Winter Night
    • 84 To the Muse
  • Beachy Head (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

CONTEXTS: THE FRENCH REVOLUTION

CONTEXTS: THE NAPOLEONIC ERA (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • from Louis Antoine Fauvelet de Bourrienne, Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte
    • from Chapter 18: 1799
    • from Chapter 22: 1799
    • from Chapter 28: 1800
  • from Barry Edmund O’Meara, Letter to Sir Hudson Lowe (28 January 1817)
  • from Madame (Germaine) de Staël, Considerations of the Principal Events of the French Revolution
    • from Chapter 4: The Advance of Bonaparte’s Absolute Power
    • from Chapter 8: On Exile
    • from Chapter 13: Bonaparte’s Return
    • from Chapter 19: Intoxication of Power; Bonaparte’s Reverses and Abdication
  • from The Corsican: A Diary of Napoleon’s Life in His Own Words
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley, “Feelings of a Republican on the Fall of Bonaparte”
  • from Thomas Babington Macaulay, “Hallam’s Constitutional History”

GEORGE CRABBE (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • The Borough
    • The Poor of the Borough: Peter Grimes
  • Arabella

WILLIAM BLAKE

MARY ROBINSON (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • January, 1795
  • from Sappho and Phaon
    • 4 (“Why, when I gaze on Phaon’s beauteous eyes”)
    • 12 (“Now, o’er the tessellated pavement strew”)
    • 18 (“Why art thou chang’d? O Phaon! tell me why?”)
    • 30 (“O’er the tall cliff that bounds the billowy main”)
    • 37 (“When, in the gloomy mansion of the dead”)
    • The Haunted Beach
    • All Alone
  • London’s Summer Morning
  • from A Letter to the Women of England

MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT

  • from A Vindication of the Rights of Woman
    • Introduction
    • Chapter 2: The Prevailing Opinion of a Sexual Character Discussed
    • from Chapter 3: The Same Subject Continued
  • IN CONTEXT: Contemporary Reviews of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman
    • from The Analytical Review 12 (1792)
    • from The Critical Review 4 (1792)
  • from Maria; or The Wrongs of Woman (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • Chapter 5

CONTEXTS: WOMEN AND SOCIETY

  • from William Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of England
    • from Book 1, Chapter 15: Of Husband and Wife
  • from Catharine Macaulay, Letters on Education
    • from Letter 21: Morals Must Be Taught on Immutable Principles
    • from Letter 22: No Characteristic Difference in Sex
  • from Olympe de Gouges, The Rights of Woman
  • from Maria Edgeworth and Richard Lovell Edgeworth, Practical Education
    • Prudence and Economy
  • from Priscilla Wakefield, Reflections on the Present Condition of the Female Sex; With Suggestions for Its Improvement
    • from Chapter 3
    • from Chapter 6
  • from Richard Polwhele, “The Unsexed Females: A Poem, Addressed to the Author of
    The Pursuits of Literature
  • from Hannah More, Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education
    • from Volume 1, Chapter 4: Comparison of the Mode of Female Education in the Last Age with the Present Age
    • from Volume 1, Chapter 6: On the Early Forming of Habits. On the Necessity of Forming the Judgment to Direct Those Habits
  • from William Thompson and Anna Wheeler, Appeal of One Half the Human Race, Women, Against the Pretensions of the Other Half, Men, to Retain Them in Political, and Thence in Civil and Domestic Slavery
    • from Introductory Letter to Mrs. Wheeler
    • from Part 2

ROBERT BURNS

*CONTEXTS: GOTHIC LITERATURE, 1764–1830

WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

  • from Lyrical Ballads, 1798
    • Advertisement
    • We Are Seven
    • Lines Written in Early Spring
    • The Thorn
    • Expostulation and Reply
    • The Tables Turned
    • Lines Written a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey
  • from Lyrical Ballads, 1800, 1802
    • Preface
    • [There was a Boy]
    • [Strange fits of passion I have known]
    • Song [She dwelt among th’untrodden ways]
    • [A slumber did my spirit seal]
    • Lucy Gray
    • Nutting
    • Michael, A Pastoral Poem
  • The Ruined Cottage (Manuscript D) (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • Part 1
    • Part 2
  • [I griev’d for Buonaparté]
  • Ode to Duty
  • Resolution and Independence
  • Composed upon Westminster Bridge, Sept. 3, 1803
  • [The world is too much with us]
  • [It is a beauteous Evening]
  • London, 1802
  • The Solitary Reaper
  • [My heart leaps up]
  • IN CONTEXT: “I wandered lonely as a Cloud”: Stages in the Life of a Poem
    • from Dorothy Wordsworth, Grasmere Journal (15 April 1802)
    • [I wandered lonely as a Cloud] 1807
    • [I wandered lonely as a Cloud] facsimile
    • [I wandered lonely as a Cloud] transcription
    • [I wandered lonely as a Cloud] 1815
  • Elegiac Stanzas
  • Ode [Intimations of Immortality]
  • from The Excursion (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • [Prospectus to The Recluse]
    • from Book First: The Wanderer [The Ruined Cottage]
  • Surprised by Joy
  • Mutability
  • Steamboats, Viaducts, and Railways
  • IN CONTEXT: Visual Depictions of “Man’s Art” (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
  • The Prelude
    • The Two-Part Prelude of 1799
      • First Part
      • Second Part
    • from The Fourteen-Book Prelude
      • from Book First: Introduction, Childhood, and School-Time
      • from Book Fifth: Books
      • from Book Sixth: Cambridge, and the Alps
      • from Book Thirteenth: Subject Concluded
      • from Book Fourteenth: Conclusion

CONTEXTS: READING, WRITING, PUBLISHING (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • from Daniel Isaac Eaton, The Pernicious Effects of the Art of Printing upon Society, Exposed
  • Thomas Spence, “Examples of Safe Printing,” from Pig’s Meat, Volume 2
  • Joshua, “Sonnet: The Lion,” from Moral and Political Magazine, Volume 1
  • from Anonymous, “On the Characteristics of Poetry,” No. 2, from the Monthly Magazine
  • from Anonymous, Letter to the Monthly Magazine (24 October 1798)
  • from Samuel Pratt, Gleanings in England: Descriptive of the Countenance, Mind, and Character of the Country
  • from Hannah More, Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education
    • from Chapter 8: “On Female Study”
  • Anna Laetitia Barbauld, “On the Origin and Progress of Novel-Writing”
  • from Isaac D’Israeli, The Case of Authors Stated, Including the History of Literary Property
  • William Hazlitt, “A Review of The St. James Chronicle, The Morning Chronicle, The Times, The New Times, The Courier, &c., Cobbett’s Weekly Journal, The Examiner, The Observer, The Gentleman’s Magazine, The New Monthly Magazine, The London, &c. &c.,” from The Edinburgh Review
  • from John Stuart Mill, “The Present State of Literature”
  • Shakespeare for Family Reading
    • from Charles and Mary Lamb, Tales from Shakespeare
      • Preface
    • from an Advertisement in The Times for Thomas Bowdler’s The Family Shakespeare
  • Copyright and the Growth of “a Reading Age”
    • from Copyright Act of 1709 (the Statute of Anne)
    • from Millar v. Taylor (1769)
    • from Hinton v. Donaldson (Scotland, 1773); Donaldson v. Beckett (England, 1774)
    • from Catharine Macaulay, A Modest Plea for the Property of Copyright
    • from Robert Southey, “Inquiries Concerning the Proposed Alteration of the Laws of Copyright, as It Affects Authors and the Universities,” Quarterly Review (January 1819)
    • from Thomas Babington Macaulay, Speech to House of Commons (5 February 1841)

SIR WALTER SCOTT (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • The Eve of St. John
  • Glenfinlas; or Lord Ronald’s Coronach
  • from Thomas the Rhymer
  • Proud Maisie
  • IN CONTEXT: Sir Walter Scott and The Keepsake for 1829
    • My Aunt Margaret’s Mirror

*DOROTHY WORDSWORTH

  • from The Grasmere Journal
  • Grasmere—A Fragment
  • Floating Island
  • Thoughts on My Sick-Bed

CONTEXTS: THE NATURAL, THE HUMAN, THE SUPERNATURAL, AND THE SUBLIME

SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE

CONTEXTS: INDIA AND THE ORIENT (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • from Sir William Jones, “A Discourse on the Institution of a Society for Inquiring into the History, Civil and Natural, the Antiquities, Arts, Sciences and Literature of Asia”
  • Edmund Burke and the Impeachment of Warren Hastings
  • from Edmund Burke, Speech on the Impeachment of Warren Hastings
    • from Warren Hastings, Address in His Defence
    • from Elizabeth Hamilton, Translations of the Letters of a Hindoo Rajah
  • from Anonymous, “Review of Translations of the Letters of a Hindoo Rajah,”
  • from The Analytical Review
  • Tipu Sultan and the British
    • from Letter from Tipu Sultan to the Governor General
    • from Declaration of the Right Honourable the Governor-General-in-Council
  • from Mary Robinson, “The Lascar”
  • from Thomas Macaulay, Minute on Indian Education
  • Roger Fenton, Orientalist Studies
  • from Col. Henry Yule and A.C. Burnell, Hobson-Jobson: A Glossary of Colloquial Anglo-Indian Words and Phrases, and of Kindred Terms, Etymological, Historical, Geographical, and Discursive

JANE AUSTEN

Lady Susan (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

    • from Pride and Prejudice
      • Chapter 1
      • Chapter 2
      • Chapter 3
      • Chapter 4

IN CONTEXT: Austen’s Letters (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

CHARLES LAMB (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • Old China
  • from On the Tragedies of Shakespeare, Considered with Reference to Their Fitness for Stage Representation

WILLIAM HAZLITT (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • from The Spirit of the Age; or Contemporary Portraits
    • Mr. Coleridge
    • Mr. Wordsworth

*THOMAS DE QUINCEY

  • from Confessions of an English Opium-Eater
    • To the Reader
    • Preliminary Confessions
    • from Part 2
      • The Pleasures of Opium
      • Introduction to the Pains of Opium
      • The Pains of Opium
  • from Suspira de Profundis (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • Levana and Our Ladies of Sorrow
    • The Apparition of the Brocken
  • from The Poetry of Pope
    • Literature of Knowledge and Literature of Power

MARY PRINCE

CONTEXTS: SLAVERY AND ITS ABOLITION

  • from John Newton, A Slave Trader’s Journal
  • from Quobna Ottobah Cugoano, Thoughts and Sentiments
  • from Alexander Falconbridge, Account of the Slave Trade on the Coast of Africa
  • William Cowper, “Sweet Meat Has Sour Sauce”
  • from William Wilberforce, “Speech to the House of Commons,” 13 May 1789
  • Proponents of Slavery
    • from Rev. Robert Boncher Nicholls, Observations
    • from Anonymous, Thoughts on the Slavery of Negroes
    • from Gordon Turnbull, An Apology of Negro Slavery
  • from Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Men
  • Anna Laetitia Barbauld, “Epistle to William Wilberforce”
  • William Blake, Images of Slavery
  • from Samuel Taylor Coleridge, On the Slave Trade
  • from William Earle, Obi; or, the History of Three-Fingered Jack
  • Mary Robinson, Poems on Slavery
    • “The African”
    • “The Negro Girl”
  • from Dorothy Wordsworth, The Grasmere Journal
  • from Thomas Clarkson, The History of the Rise, Progress and Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave Trade
  • from Matthew Gregory Lewis, Journal of a West India Proprietor
  • from Elizabeth Heyrick, Immediate, Not Gradual Abolition
  • The Haitian Revolution
    • from Baron de Wimpffen, A Voyage to Saint Domingo, in the Years 1788, 1789, and 1790
      • from Letter 12, May 1789
      • from Letter 23, March 1790
    • from “Insurrection at St. Domingo: No. 1: Remarks on the Resolutions of the West-India Merchants and Planters, at the London Tavern, Nov. 3, and 8, 1791,” Star and Evening Advertiser (18 November 1791)
    • William Wordsworth, “To Toussaint L’Ouverture”
    • from Jean-Jacques Dessalines, “Liberty or Death. Proclamation. Jean Jacques Dessalines, Governor General, to the People of Hayti”

GEORGE GORDON, LORD BYRON

  • Sun of the Sleepless
  • She walks in beauty
  • When we two parted
  • Stanzas for Music
  • from Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • Canto the Third
    • from Canto the Fourth
  • Darkness
  • Prometheus
  • Manfred (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
  • IN CONTEXT: The Manuscript Version of Manfred, Act 3
  • So, we’ll go no more a roving
  • When a man hath no freedom to fight for at home
  • January 22nd 1842. Missolonghi
  • Epistle to Augusta
  • from Don Juan (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • Dedication
    • Canto 1
    • Canto 2
    • from Canto 3
    • from Canto 7
    • from Canto 11
  • IN CONTEXT: Don Juan (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
      “Remarks on Don Juan,” from Blackwood’s Magazine
  • Personal Writings (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • To Catherine Gordon Byron, 12 November 1809
    • from a letter to Francis Hodgson, 13 September 1811
    • To Lady Melbourne, 21 September 1813
    • To Lady Byron, 8 February 1816
    • To Augusta Leigh, 17 September 1816
    • from “Alpine Journal”
      • 20 September 1816
      • 21 September 1816
      • 22 September 1816
      • 23 September 1816
    • To Augusta Leigh, 19 December 1816
    • To Thomas Moore, 19 September 1818
    • To Douglas Kinnaird, 26 October 1818 [1819]
    • To John Cam Hobhouse, 11 November 1818
    • To John Cam Hobhouse, 6 April 1819
    • To John Murray, 6 April 1819
    • To John Cam Hobhouse, 17 May 1819
    • To Richard Belgrave Hoppner, 6 June 1819
    • To John Murray, 1 August 1819
    • To John Murray, 12 August 1819
    • To Douglas Kinnaird, 26 October 1819
    • from a letter to John Murray, 16 February 1821
    • To Thomas Moore, 4 March 1824
  • IN CONTEXT: The Byronic Hero
    • from The Corsair: A Tale
    • from Lara: A Tale

PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY

FELICIA HEMANS

  • The Homes of England
  • The Land of Dreams
  • Evening Prayer at a Girls’ School
  • Casabianca
  • Corinne at the Capitol
  • The Effigies
  • The Image in Lava
  • Properzia Rossi
  • Woman and Fame

*JOHN CLARE

JOHN KEATS

  • On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer
  • On the Grasshopper and Cricket
  • Sleep and Poetry
  • On Seeing the Elgin Marbles
  • On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again
  • When I Have Fears that I May Cease to Be
  • Epistle to John Hamilton Reynolds
  • To Homer
  • The Eve of St. Agnes
  • Bright Star
  • La Belle Dame sans Merci
  • La Belle Dame sans Mercy
  • Incipit altera Sonneta
  • Ode to Psyche
  • Ode to a Nightingale
  • Ode on a Grecian Urn
  • Ode on Melancholy
  • Ode on Indolence
  • To Autumn
  • Lamia (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
  • The Fall of Hyperion, A Dream (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • Canto 1
    • Canto 2
  • This Living Hand
  • Selected Letters
    • To Benjamin Bailey (22 November 1817)
    • To George and Thomas Keats (December 1817)
    • To John Hamilton Reynolds (3 February 1818)
    • To John Taylor (27 February 1818)
    • To Benjamin Bailey (13 March 1818)
    • To Benjamin Bailey (18 July 1818)
    • To Richard Woodhouse (27 October 1818)
    • To George and Georgiana Keats (14 February–3 May 1819)
    • To Fanny Brawne (25 July 1819)
    • To Percy Bysshe Shelley (16 August 1820)
    • To Charles Brown (30 November 1820)
  • IN CONTEXT: Politics, Poetry, and the “Cockney School Debate”
    • from Leigh Hunt, “Young Poets,” Examiner (1 December 1816)
    • from John Lockhart (“Z.”), “On the Cockney School of Poetry, No. 1,” Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine (October 1817)
    • from John Lockhart (“Z.”), “On the Cockney School of Poetry, No. 4,” Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine (August 1818)
  • IN CONTEXT: The Elgin Marbles (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • Selected Photographs
    • from William Hazlitt, “Sir Joshua Reynold’s Discourses”
    • from William Hazlitt, “Report on the Select Committee of the House of Commons on the Elgin Marbles”
    • from B.R. Haydon, “On the Judgement of Connoisseurs Being Preferred to that of Professional Men—Elgin Marbles etc.”
  • IN CONTEXT: The Death of Keats (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • Joseph Severn to Charles Brown

MARY SHELLEY

LETITIA ELIZABETH LANDON (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • Lines Written Under a Picture of a Girl Burning a Love Letter
  • A Child Screening a Dove From a Hawk
  • Love’s Last Lesson
  • Lines of Life
  • Revenge
  • The Little Shroud
  • The Fairy of the Fountains

CONTEXTS: STEAM POWER AND THE MACHINE AGE (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • from Humphrey Davy, A Discourse, Introductory to a Course of Lectures on Chemistry
  • Luddite Documents
    • Declaration, November 1811
    • Letter to Mr. Kirby, Cotton Master at Candis his factory, Ancoates (1812)
    • “General Justice,” Letter to Mr. Garside, 19 April 1812
  • Industrialization in Canada
    • from Quebec Mercury, 6 November 1809
    • from Montreal Gazette, 6 November 1822
  • from The Times, London, Tuesday, 29 November 1814
  • from Robert Owen, Observations on the Effects of the Manufacturing System
  • from Thomas Babington Macaulay, A Review of Southey’s Colloquies
  • from Fanny Kemble, Letter to H., 26 August 1830
  • from Harriet Martineau, A Manchester Strike
    • from Chapter 1: The Week’s End
    • from Chapter 5: No Progress Made
  • from Orestes Brownson, “The Laboring Classes”
  • from George Ripley, Letter to Ralph Waldo Emerson, Boston, 9 November 1840

INTRODUCTION TO THE VICTORIAN ERA

  • A Growing Power
  • Grinding Mills, Grinding Poverty
  • Corn Laws, Potato Famine
  • “The Two Nations”
  • The Politics of Gender
  • Empire
  • Faith and Doubt
  • Victorian Domesticity: Life and Death
  • Cultural Trends
  • Technology
  • Cultural Identities
  • Realism
  • The Victorian Novel
  • Poetry
  • Drama
  • Prose Non-Fiction and Print Culture
  • The English Language in the Victorian Era

HISTORY OF THE LANGUAGE AND PRINT CULTURE

THOMAS CARLYLE

  • from Sartor Resartus (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • from Book 2
      • Chapter 6: Sorrows of Teufelsdröckh
    • from Book 3
      • Chapter 8: Natural Supernaturalism
  • from Past and Present
    • from Book 1
      • Chapter 1: Midas
      • Chapter 6: Hero-Worship
    • from Book 3 (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)Chapter 1: Phenomena
      • Chapter 2: Gospel of Mammonism
      • from Chapter 13: Democracy
    • from Book 4
      • Chapter 4: Captains of Industry

*LITERARY CURRENTS IN IRELAND, SCOTLAND, AND WALES IN THE LONG NINETEENTH CENTURY

  • Ireland
    • Songs of ’98
      • Slievenamon
      • Carroll Malone, “The Croppy Boy”
    • William Carleton
      • from Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry
      • from The Black Prophet; A Tale of Irish Famine
    • Aodh Mac Domhnaill
      • The Spoiling of the Potatoes
    • Emily Lawless
      • After Aughrim
      • To _______, Aged Twenty-Two
      • Emigrants
    • John Keegan Casey
      • The Rising of the Moon
    • Maud Gonne
      • The Famine Queen
    • Patrick Pearse
      • The Mother
      • Mise Éire / I am Ireland
    • Frank O’Connor (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
      • The Majesty of the Law
    • Winnifred Mary Letts
      • Deirdre in the Street
      • The Old Wexford Woman
      • The Deserter
    • Katherine Tynan
      • The Long Vacation
      • Herbal
      • For your Sake
    • Eve Gore-Booth
      • Women’s Rights
      • 1916
  • Scotland
    • Sir Walter Scott (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
      • The Two Drovers
    • John Galt
      • from Annals of the parish: or, The chronicle of Dalmailing; during the ministry of the Rev. Micah Balwhidder, written by himself
    • John Davidson (1857-1909)
      • from The Testament of an Empire Builder
    • Margaret Oliphant
      • From A Child’s History of Scotland
        • Chapter 22: The Union
  • Wales
    • Alun (John Blackwell)
        X

      • Cathl I’r Eos / Song of the Nightengale
    • Evan James
      • Hen Wlad fy Nhadau / Land of My Fathers
    • Sarah Jane Rees [Cranogwen]
      • The End of the Year
    • Alice Gray Jones [Ceridwen Peris]
      • A New Year Greeting—1929
      • Song of the Worker’s Wife
    • O.M. Edwards
      • The Soul of a Nation

CONTEXTS: WORK AND POVERTY (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

JOHN STUART MILL

  • from The Subjection of Women
    • Chapter 1

CONTEXTS: THE PLACE OF WOMEN IN SOCIETY

  • from Sarah Stickney Ellis, The Daughters of England: Their Position in Society, Character and Responsibilities
  • from Anonymous, “Hints on the Modern Governess System,” Fraser’s Magazine (November 1844)
  • from Harriet Taylor, The Enfranchisement of Women
  • from Coventry Patmore, The Angel in the House
    • The Wife’s Tragedy
    • The Foreign Land
  • from William Rathbone Greg, “Why Are Women Redundant?”
  • from Frances Power Cobbe, “What Shall We Do with Our Old Maids?”
  • from Eliza Lynn Linton, “The Girl of the Period,” Saturday Review (March 1868)
  • from Frances Power Cobbe, “Criminals, Idiots, Women, and Minors,” Fraser’s Magazine (December 1868)
  • May Probyn, “The Model” (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
  • from “Between School and Marriage,” The Girl’s Own Paper, Vol. 7 (4 September 1886)
  • from Emma Brewer, “Our Friends the Servants,” The Girl’s Own Paper, Vol. 14 (25 March 1893)
  • from Grant Allen, “Plain Words on the Woman Question,” Fortnightly Review 46 (October 1889)
  • from Sarah Grand, “The New Aspect of the Woman Question,” North American Review 158 (March 1894)
  • from Mona Caird, “Does Marriage Hinder a Woman’s Self-Development?” Lady’s Realm (March 1899)
  • *Prostitution and the Contagious Diseases Act (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • Thomas Hood, “The Bridge of Sighs”
    • from Henry Mayhew, “Labour and the Poor: The Metropolitan Districts,” The Morning Chronicle (1849)
    • from W.R. Greg, “Prostitution,” Westminster Review (January 1850)
    • from The Contagious Diseases Act
    • from Harriet Martineau, “The Contagious Diseases Acts – II,” Daily News (29 December 1869)
    • from Josephine Butler, Personal Reminiscences of a Great Crusade
    • from Josephine Butler, Some Thoughts on the Present Aspect of the Crusade Against the State Regulation of Vice
    • from Sarah Grand, The Beth Book

ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING

ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON

CHARLES DARWIN

  • from The Voyage of the Beagle (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • from Chapter 10: Tierra del Fuego
    • from Chapter 17: Galapagos Archipelago
  • from On the Origin of Species
    • Introduction
    • from Chapter 3: Struggle for Existence
    • from Chapter 14: Recapitulation and Conclusion
  • from The Descent of Man
    • from Chapter 19: Secondary Sexual Characters of Man
    • from Chapter 21: General Summary and Conclusion
  • IN CONTEXT: Defending and Attacking Darwin
    • from Thomas Huxley, “Criticisms on The Origin of Species”
    • from Thomas Huxley, “Mr. Darwin’s Critics”
    • from Punch
  • IN CONTEXT: Social Darwinism
    • from Herbert Spencer, Social Statics: or, the Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified, and the First of Them Developed

ELIZABETH GASKELL

ROBERT BROWNING

CHARLES DICKENS

CONTEXTS: CHILDHOOD AND CHILDREN’S LITERATURE (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • from Charlotte Mary Yonge, “A Scene in the Early Life of the May Family”
  • from Thomas Hughes, “After the Match,” Tom Brown’s Schooldays
  • from Charles Kingsley, “Tom’s Life as a Water Baby”
  • from Thomas Hood, “London Street Boys: Being a Word About Arabia Anglicana,” The Boy’s Own Volume of Facts, Fiction, History, and Adventure
  • from Austin Q. Hagerman, “Never Sulk,” The Child’s Own Magazine
  • from Charles Darwin, A Biographical Sketch of an Infant
  • from Walter Pater, The Child in the House
  • from Hilaire Belloc, The Bad Child’s Book of Beasts
    • Introduction
    • The Big Baboon
    • The Frog
  • Beatrix Potter, The Tale of Peter Rabbit
  • from Rudyard Kipling, “How the Camel Got His Hump,” Just So Stories for Little Children
  • from Lucy Maud Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables
    • Chapter 3: Marilla Cuthbert is Surprised
  • from Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows
    • Chapter 1: The River Bank

*EMILY BRONTË

CONTEXTS: THE NEW ART OF PHOTOGRAPHY

  • Roger Fenton, “Proposal for the Formation of a Photographic Society”
  • from Charles Dickens, “Photography,” Household Words, Vol. 7 (1853)
  • Photography and Immortality
    • from Elizabeth Barrett, Letter to Mary Russell Mitford
    • from Sir Frederick Pollock, “Presidential Address,” Photographic Society
  • Selected Photographs

GEORGE ELIOT

JOHN RUSKIN

  • from Modern Painters
    • A Definition of Greatness in Art
    • Of Truth of Water
  • from The Stones of Venice
    • The Nature of Gothic

MATTHEW ARNOLD

CONTEXTS: RELIGION AND SOCIETY (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • from Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre
    • from Chapter 4
  • from Elizabeth Gaskell, Mary Barton
    • from Chapter 37
  • from Anthony Trollope, The Warden
    • from Chapter 3
    • from Chapter 5
  • from George Eliot, “Evangelical Teaching: Dr. Cumming” (Westminster Review, October 1855)
  • from Anthony Trollope, Doctor Thorne
    • from Chapter 32: Mr. Oriel
  • from Thomas Hughes, Tom Brown at Oxford
    • from Chapter 11: Muscular Christianity
  • from Arthur Hugh Clough, Dipsychus
    • “There is No God,” the Wicked Saith
  • from John Henry Newman, Apologia pro vita sua
    • from Chapter 5: The Position of My Mind Since 1845
  • from Samuel Smiles, Character
    • from Chapter 7: Duty—Truthfulness
  • from Anthony Trollope, The Way We Live Now
    • from Chapter 22: Lord Nidderdale’s Morality
    • from Chapter 60: Miss Longestaffe’s Lover
  • from Goldwin Smith, “Can Jews Be Patriots?” (The Nineteenth Century, May 1878)
  • from Amy Levy, Reuben Sachs
    • from Chapter 7
    • from Chapter 8
  • from Thomas Huxley, “Agnosticism and Christianity”
  • from Thomas Hardy, Jude the Obscure
    • from Part 3, Chapter 4

DANTE GABRIEL ROSSETTI

  • The Blessed Damozel
  • The Woodspurge
  • Jenny
  • My Sister’s Sleep
  • Sibylla Palmifera (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
  • Lady Lilith
  • Mary Magdalene at the Door of Simon the Pharisee
  • from The House of Life
  • The Sonnet
    • 6a: Nuptial Sleep
    • 10: The Portrait
    • 97: A Superscription
    • 101: The One Hope
  • *IN CONTEXT: The Pre-Raphaelites
    • from William Michael Rossetti, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, His Family Letters, with a Memoir by William Michael Rossetti
    • from Chapter 13: The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood
    • from John G. Millais, The Life and Letters of Sir John Everett Millais
    • Charles Dickens, “Old Lamps for New Ones”
    • from Reviews of the Royal Academy Show, The Times, 3 May, 7 May 1851
    • from John Ruskin, Letters to The Times, 13 May, 26 May 1851
  • IN CONTEXT: The “Fleshly School” Controversy (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • from Robert Buchanan, “The Fleshly School of Poetry: Mr. D.G. Rossetti”
    • from Dante Gabriel Rossetti, The Stealthy School of Criticism

CHRISTINA ROSSETTI

  • Goblin Market
  • IN CONTEXT: Illustrating Goblin Market
  • A Triad
  • Remember
  • A Birthday
  • After Death
  • An Apple-Gathering
  • Echo
  • Winter: My Secret
  • “No, Thank You, John”
  • A Pause of Thought
  • Song (“She sat and sang alway”)
  • Song (“When I am dead, my dearest”)
  • Dead Before Death
  • Monna Innominata
  • Cobwebs
  • In an Artist’s Studio
  • Promises like Pie-Crust
  • In Progress
  • Sleeping at Last

LEWIS CARROLL

  • Verses Recited by Humpty Dumpty
  • Jabberwocky
  • IN CONTEXT: “Jabberwocky”
    • from Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There
      • from Chapter 1: Looking-Glass House
      • from Chapter 6: Humpty Dumpty
  • IN CONTEXT: The Photographs of Lewis Carroll

WILLIAM MORRIS (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • The Defence of Guenevere
  • The Haystack in the Floods
  • from Hopes and Fears for Art. Five Lectures
  • The Beauty of Life
  • from News from Nowhere
    • Chapter 1: Discussion and Bed
    • Chapter 2: A Morning Bath
  • How I Became a Socialist
  • IN CONTEXT: William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones

AUGUSTA WEBSTER (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • A Castaway
  • By the Looking Glass
  • The Happiest Girl in the World
  • from Mother and Daughter: An Uncompleted Sonnet Sequence
    • Sonnet 1 (“Young Laughters, and My Music! Aye Till Now”)
    • Sonnet 8 (“A little child she, half defiant came”)
    • Sonnet 9 (“Oh weary hearts! Poor mothers that look back!”)
    • Sonnet 15 (“That same day Death who has us all for jest”)
    • Sonnet 19 (“Life on the wane: yes sudden that news breaks”)
    • Sonnet 20 (“There’s one I miss. A little questioning maid”)
    • Sonnet 27 (“Since first my little one lay on my breast”)

ALGERNON CHARLES SWINBURNE

*WALTER PATER

THOMAS HARDY

GERARD MANLEY HOPKINS

  • God’s Grandeur
  • The Wreck of the Deutschland (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
  • The Windhover: To Christ Our Lord
  • Pied Beauty
  • Felix Randal
  • Spring and Fall: To a Young Child
  • [As kingfishers catch fire]
  • [No worst, there is none]
  • [I wake and feel the fell of dark, not day]
  • [Not, I’ll not, carrion comfort]
  • That Nature Is a Heraclitean Fire and of the Comfort of the Resurrection
  • [Thou art indeed just, Lord ]
  • IN CONTEXT: The Growth of “The Windhover”
  • from Journal 1870–74
    • [“Inscape” and “Instress”]
  • from Letter to Robert Bridges, 25 February 1879
  • Author’s Preface

“MICHAEL FIELD”—KATHARINE BRADLEY AND EDITH COOPER

*ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

OSCAR WILDE

VERNON LEE (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • The Virgin of the Seven Daggers
  • Prince Alberic and the Snake Lady
  • from The Handling of Words
    • Chapter 3: Aesthetics of the Novel
    • from Chapter 5
      • Section C: Carlyle and the Present Tense
    • from Chapter 6
      • Section A: Meredith
      • Section B: Kipling
      • Section C: Stevenson
      • Section D: Hardy
    • Chapter 8: Can Writing Be Taught?

SIR ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE

  • The Adventure of the Speckled Band

AMY LEVY (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • Xantippe
  • Magdalen
  • To Lallie
  • A London Plane-Tree
  • London in July
  • “Ballade of an Omnibus”
  • London Poets: (In Memoriam)
  • The Old House
  • The Last Judgment
  • Cambridge in the Long
  • To Vernon Lee

RUDYARD KIPLING

CONTEXTS: BRITAIN, EMPIRE, AND A WIDER WORLD

    • Thomas Pringle, “Afar in the Desert” (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • from Frances Trollope, Domestic Manners of the Americans
      • from Chapter 1: Entrance of the Mississippi
      • from Chapter 3: Company on Board the Steam Boat
      • from Chapter 34: Return to New York—Conclusion
    • from Thomas Babington Macaulay, “Minute on Indian Education”
    • from Report of a Speech by William Charles Wentworth, Australian Legislative Council (1844)
    • from William H. Smith, Smith’s Canadian Gazetteer (1846) (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • Carlyle, Mill, and “The Negro Question”
      • from Thomas Carlyle, “Occasional Discourse on the Negro Question,” Fraser’s Magazine (1849)
      • from John Stuart Mill, “The Negro Question,” Fraser’s Magazine (1850)
    • The Great Exhibition of 1851
      • Prince Albert, Speech Delivered at the Lord Mayor’s Banquet, London, 1849
      • from The Art Journal Illustrated Catalogue of the Great Exhibition of The Industry of All Nations
    • from Henry Mayhew, London Labour and the London Poor
      • “Hindo Beggars”
    • Dickens and Thackeray on the Race Question
      • from Charles Dickens, “The Noble Savage,” Household Words(1853)
      • from William Makepeace Thackeray, Letters to Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth
        • To Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth (26 January 1853)
        • To Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth (13 February 1853)
    • Conservatives, Liberals, and Empire
      • from William Gladstone, “Our Colonies”
      • from Benjamin Disraeli, “Conservative and Liberal Principles”
    • from Cecil Rhodes, Speech Delivered in Cape Town (18 July 1899)
    • from David Livingstone, “Cambridge Lecture Number 1”
    • Eliza M., “Account of Cape Town,” King William’s Town Gazette (1863)
    • from Agnes Macdonald, “By Car and Cowcatcher,” Murray’s Magazine (1887) (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

Henry Lawson, “The Drover’s Wife”

INTRODUCTION TO THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY: FROM 1900 TO MID-CENTURY

  • The Edwardian Period
  • The World Wars
  • Marx, Einstein, Freud, and Modernism
  • The Place of Women
  • Avant-Garde and Mass Culture
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Ireland
  • Ideology and Economics in the 1930s and 1940s
  • The Literature of the 1930s and 1940s
  • Literature and Empire
  • The English Language in the Early Twentieth Century

HISTORY OF THE LANGUAGE AND OF PRINT CULTURE

BERNARD SHAW (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • Mrs. Warren’s Profession

JOSEPH CONRAD

A.E. HOUSMAN (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • Loveliest of Trees
  • To an Athlete Dying Young
  • Terence, This Is Stupid Stuff
  • The Chestnut Casts His Flambeaux
  • Epitaph on an Army of Mercenaries

SIEGFRIED SASSOON

  • They
  • Glory of Women
  • Everyone Sang
  • from Memoirs of an Infantry Officer

*ISAAC ROSENBERG

  • Break of Day in the Trenches
  • Dead Man’s Dump
  • Louse Hunting
  • Returning, We Hear the Larks

WILFRED OWEN

  • A Terre
  • The Sentry
  • Disabled
  • Strange Meeting
  • Parable of the Old Man and the Young
  • Arms and the Boy
  • Anthem for Doomed Youth
  • The Send-Off
  • Dulce et Decorum Est
  • Futility

CONTEXTS: WAR AND REVOLUTION

  • from Anonymous, “Introduction” to Songs and Sonnets for England in War Time
  • “In Flanders Fields”: The Poem and Some Responses
    • John McCrae, “In Flanders Fields”
    • John Mitchell, “Reply to ‘In Flanders Fields’”
    • J.A. Armstrong, “Another Reply to ‘In Flanders Fields’”
    • Elizabeth Daryush, “Flanders Fields”
  • Anonymous, “I Learned to Wash in Shell-Holes”
  • J.P. Long and Maurice Scott, “Oh! It’s a Lovely War”
  • from Rebecca West, “The Cordite Makers”
  • from Francis Marion Beynon, Aleta Day
    • from Chapter 24: War
  • Ivor Gurney, “To His Love”
  • Vance Palmer, “The Farmer Remembers the Somme”
  • from Robert Graves, Good-Bye to All That
    • from Chapter 17
  • from “Proceedings” of the All-Russian Central Executive Committee of Soviets of Workers’, Soldiers’, and Peasants’ Deputies
  • from John Reed, Ten Days That Shook the World

WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS

H.G. WELLS (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • The New Accelerator
  • The Star
  • IN CONTEXT: Wells’s Non-Fiction
    • from H.G. Wells, The Extinction of Man: Some Speculative Suggestions

VIRGINIA WOOLF

CONTEXTS: GENDER AND SEXUAL ORIENTATION (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • from Edward Carpenter, Love’s Coming of Age
      “The Intermediate Sex”
  • from Havelock Ellis, Sexual Inversion
    • from Chapter 3: Sexual Inversion in Men
    • from Chapter 4: Sexual Inversion in Women
    • from Chapter 5: The Nature of Sexual Inversion
  • from Grant Allen, “Woman’s Place in Nature”
  • from Cicely Hamilton, Marriage as a Trade
    • Female Suffrage
  • Anonymous, [“There Was a Small Woman Called G”]
  • from Emmeline Pankhurst, My Own Story
  • from Marie Stopes, Married Love
  • from Virginia Woolf, Orlando
  • from George Orwell, “Boys’ Weeklies”
  • from Frank Richard, “Frank Richard Replies to George Orwell”
  • from Virginia Woolf, “Old Bloomsbury”

JAMES JOYCE

  • Araby
  • Eveline
  • The Dead
  • *from Ulysses
    • Chapter 13 [Nausicaa]
  • IN CONTEXT: Joyce’s Dublin

D.H. LAWRENCE

KATHERINE MANSFIELD

T.S. ELIOT

  • The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock
  • Preludes
  • Burbank with a Baedeker: Bleistein with a Cigar
  • Gerontion
  • The Waste Land
  • Journey of the Magi
  • Burnt Norton
  • Tradition and the Individual Talent
  • The Metaphysical Poets
  • IN CONTEXT: T.S. Eliot and Anti-Semitism
  • *IN CONTEXT: Reactions to the Poems of T.S. Eliot (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • from Arthur Waugh, “The New Poetry,” Quarterly Review
    • from unsigned “Review,” Literary World
    • from unsigned “Review,” New Statesman
    • from May Sinclair, “Prufrock and Other Observations: A Criticism,” Little Review
    • from “Review of the First Issue of The Criterion,” The Times Literary Supplement
    • from Douglas LePan, “Personality of the Poet: Some Recollections of T.S. Eliot”

CONTEXTS: THE VORTEX OF MODERNISM

    • from Jules Huret, “Interview with Stephane Mallarmé,” L’Echo de Paris
    • Imagist and Futurist Poetry: A Sampling
      • T.E. Hulme
        • “Autumn”
      • Ezra Pound
        • “In a Station of the Metro”
        • “Alba”
        • “L’Art”
      • H.D.
        • “Oread”
        • “The Pool”
      • Mina Loy
        • from “Three Moments in Paris
          • 1. One O’Clock at Night
        • from “Love Songs”
    • Imagism and Vorticism
      • from Ezra Pound, “A Few Don’ts By an Imagiste,” Poetry (March 1913)
      • from Ezra Pound, “Vorticism,” Gaudier-Brzeska
    • Dorothy Richardson and Stream of Consciousness
      • from May Sinclair, “The Novels of Dorothy Richardson,” The Little Review(April 1918)
      • from Dorothy Richardson, “Foreword” to Pilgrimage (1938)

from Virginia Woolf, “Character in Fiction”

JEAN RHYS

  • Let Them Call It Jazz

STEVIE SMITH

  • Mother, Among the Dustbins
  • The River God
  • Not Waving but Drowning
  • The Blue from Heaven
  • *Thoughts About the Person from Porlock
  • Pretty

GEORGE ORWELL

W.H. AUDEN

  • [At last the secret is out]
  • [Funeral Blues]
  • [Lullaby]
  • Musée des Beaux Arts
  • In Memory of W.B. Yeats
  • September 1, 1939
  • from The Sea and the Mirror [Song of the Master and Boatswain]

*CONTEXTS: WORLD WAR II

  • Winston Churchill, Speeches to the House of Commons
    • from “Blood, Toil, Tears, and Sweat,” 13 May 1940
    • from “We Shall Fight on the Beaches,” 4 June 1940
    • from “Their Finest Hour,” 18 June 1940
  • from Harold Nicholson, The War Years: 1939–1945
  • from Charles Ritchie, The Siren Years
  • Nat Burton and Walter Kent, “The White Cliffs of Dover”
  • Anonymous, Fucking Tobruk (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
  • Keith Douglas, “Vergissmeinnicht”
  • from Henry Reed, Lessons of War
    • 1. Naming of Parts
  • Douglas LePan
    • “Below Monte Cassino”
    • “The Haystack”
  • Life at Home
  • Anti-Semitism and World War II
    • from Ezra Pound, “Speech to the English”
    • from George Orwell, “Anti-Semitism in Britain”
  • from Rebecca West, “Greenhouse with Cyclamens”

INTRODUCTION TO THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY AND BEYOND: FROM 1945 TO TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

  • The End of the War and the Coming of the Welfare State
  • The End of Empire
  • From the 1960s to Century’s End
  • Ireland, Scotland, Wales
  • The New Millennium
  • The History of the English Language

SAMUEL BECKETT

  • *Endgame

DYLAN THOMAS

  • The Force That Through the Green Fuse Drives the Flower
  • Fern Hill
  • Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night
  • A Refusal to Mourn the Death, by Fire, of a Child in London

PHILIP LARKIN

  • Days
  • Church Going
  • Talking in Bed
  • Annus Mirabilis
  • High Windows
  • This Be the Verse
  • The Old Fools
  • Aubade

TED HUGHES

  • The Thought-Fox
  • Pike
  • Heptonstall Old Church
  • Daffodils

CHINUA ACHEBE

  • Dead Men’s Path
  • from “An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad’s Heart of Darkness

*DEREK WALCOTT

  • A Far Cry from Africa
  • Ruins of a Great House
  • from Omeros
  • Love After Love

SEAMUS HEANEY

  • Digging
  • Thatcher
  • The Wife’s Tale
  • The Grauballe Man
  • Punishment
  • Casualty
  • Anything Can Happen
  • Uncoupled
  • [The door was open and the house was dark]

ALICE MUNRO (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • Silence

NGŨGĨ WA THIONG’O

  • from Decolonising the Mind
    • Chapter 3
    • Chapter 4
    • Chapter 5

MARGARET ATWOOD

ANGELA CARTER

  • *The Werewolf
  • *The Snow Child

JOHN CLEESE AND GRAHAM CHAPMAN

  • from Monty Python’s Flying Circus
    • Dead Parrot Sketch
    • Pet Conversion
    • Dirty Hungarian Phrasebook
    • Spam

J.M. COETZEE

  • *Lies

EAVAN BOLAND

  • Night Feed
  • The Lost Land

SALMAN RUSHDIE

  • Is Nothing Sacred?

*TOMSON HIGHWAY

  • Hearts and Flowers

*HILARY MANTEL

  • The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher

KAZUO ISHIGURO

  • A Village After Dark

CAROL ANN DUFFY

  • The Good Teachers
  • Drunk
  • Mrs. Lazarus
  • *Rapture
  • John Barleycorn
  • Water

*JANICE GALLOWAY (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

  • Jellyfish

*JEANETTE WINTERSON

  • from Oranges are Not the Only Fruit

ZADIE SMITH

  • The Waiter’s Wife

*CHIMAMANDA NGOZI ADICHIE

  • A Private Experience

LITERATURE, POLITICS, AND CULTURAL IDENTITY IN THE LATE TWENTIETH AND EARLY TWENTY-FIRST CENTURIES

  • Louise Bennett
    • Colonization in Reverse
  • *Sorley MacLean
    • A Highland Woman
    • Hallaig
  • Edwin Morgan
  • *Kamau Brathwaite
    • from History of the Voice
    • from Calypso
  • *Gillian Clarke
    • Polar
  • Geoffrey Hill
    • A Short History of British India (2)
  • Tony Harrison
    • Them & [uz]
  • *James Kelman
    • This Man for Fuck Sake
    • Acid
  • Liz Lochhead
    • Men Talk
    • Kidspoem/Bairnsang
  • Grace Nichols
    • Skanking Englishman Between Trains
    • Epilogue
    • White
  • Medbh McGuckian
    • Slips
    • The Dream-Language of Fergus
  • Paul Muldoon
    • *At Tuam
    • Milkweed and Monarch
  • Linton Kwesi Johnson
    • Inglan Is a Bitch
  • Moniza Alvi
    • And If
    • How the World Split in Two
  • Jean Binta Breeze
    • earth cries
  • Gwyneth Lewis
    • Mother Tongue
  • Kenan Malik
    • Multiculturalism and the Road to Terror
  • Jackie Kay
    • In My Country
  • Simon Armitage
    • The English
    • *Poundland
  • Alice Oswald
    • Dunt
  • *Kim Moore
    • In That Year
    • I Have Been a Long Time Without Thinking
  • *Warsan Shire
    • Backwards
    • from Conversations about Home

APPENDICES

Our Editorial Team:

Joseph Black, University of Massachusetts
Leonard Conolly, Trent University
Kate Flint, University of Southern California
Isobel Grundy, University of Alberta
Roy Liuzza, University of Tennessee
Jerome McGann, University of Virginia
Anne Prescott, Barnard College
Barry Qualls, Rutgers University
Claire Waters, University of California Davis

Features of The Broadview Anthology of British Literature

  • — Superb, comprehensive introductions
  • — Extraordinarily wide range of authors
  • — Close attention paid to issues of race, gender, class, and sexual orientation
  • — Substantial coverage of the worldwide connections of British literature
  • — More extensive—and more helpful—annotations than in competing anthologies
  • — Companion website includes a wide range of additional selections (as well as an audio library, review questions, chronological charts, and more)
  • — Extensive illustrations throughout, including color illustrations
  • — Fuller range of contextual materials than any competing anthology
  • — Customized coursepack options available
  • — Package options including a free Broadview edition with any anthology volume
  • — Online instructor’s guide

Features of Concise Volume B

  • — Abundant reproductions of paintings and photographs from the relevant periods, including some in colour
  • — Contextual materials for key individual works and authors
  • — Complete texts of longer works including Goblin Market, Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, The Importance of Being Earnest, The Waste Land, and Endgame
  • — “Contexts” sections including “The French Revolution,” “Gothic
    Literature,” “Women and Society,” “The Natural and the Sublime,” “Slavery and
    Its Abolition,” “The New Art of Photography,” “Britain, Empire, and a Wider
    World,” “War and Revolution,” and “The Vortex of Modernism”
  • — Companion website includes complete texts of Byron’s Manfred, Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience, and Tennyson’s In Memoriam A.H.H.
  • — Volume concludes with an updated omnibus section addressing “Literature, Politics, and Cultural Identity in the Late Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries”

Features New to the Third Edition

  • — New longer texts including Dickens’s performance reading of “David Copperfield,” Gaskell’s The Manchester Marriage, Stevenson’s Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and Beckett’s Endgame
  • — New short selections from longer works including Eliot’s Middlemarch, Shelley’s Frankenstein, Barrett Browning’s Aurora Leigh, and Tennyson’s In Memoriam A.H.H.
  • — New bound-book author entries for Dorothy Wordsworth, John Clare, Emily Brontë, Thomas de Quincey, Walter Pater, Isaac Rosenberg, Tomson Highway, Derek Walcott, Jeanette Winterson, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  • — New selections representing “Literary Currents in Ireland, Scotland, and Wales in the Long Nineteenth Century”
  • — New “Contexts” section on “Gothic Literature” including materials by Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, and Jane Austen
  • — “Literature, Politics, and Cultural Identity” section includes numerous new authors and pieces, including work by Sorely MacLean, James Kelman, Gillian Clarke, Kamau Brathwaite, Kim Moore, and Warsan Shire

The Broadview Anthology of British Literature companion sites include content for both instructors and students.

The Online Resources Site for both students and instructors features close to 200 interactive review questions; over 500 online readings across all volumes of the anthology, with 128 additional readings specific to this volume; details on British currency; chronological charts; bibliographies; an audio library with 37 samples ranging from Old English to the early 20th Century; and more. An access code to the website is included with all new copies. If you purchased a used copy or are missing your passcode for this site, please click here to purchase a code online.

A separate instructor site features background material, over 200 discussion questions, and “Approaches to Teaching” for key works and authors in the anthology; it also offers a list of anthology contents by theme and region. An access code to the website is included with all examination copies.

BUNDLE WITH EDITIONS:

Add any edition to a package containing one or more BABL volumes for FREE! A second edition may be added for only $10. To view a complete list of available editions, please click here.

MULTI-VOLUME PACKAGES:

Package Pricing for The Broadview Anthology of British Literature:

PACKAGE OF ANY TWO OF VOLUMES 1-6: $81.95 US/CDN
PACKAGE OF ANY THREE OF VOLUMES 1-6: $94.95 US/CDN
PACKAGE OF CONCISE EDITION A&B: $109.95 US/CDN

Please note that packages containing four or more volumes may need to be split up due to their bulk. Please contact your Broadview Rep or customerservice@broadviewpress.com for a package ISBN.

COURSEPACK OPTION:

Broadview is happy to create a custom coursepack including only your selected readings, from this and/or any of our other anthologies and editions (with the exception of readings that are controlled by a rights holder other than Broadview Press). We offer an easy and intuitive Custom Text Builder, and you can also contact our Custom Text Administrator.

If you would like to inquire about different package possibilities, please contact customerservice@broadviewpress.com or your local sales representative to be sure of obtaining the most advantageous pricing option for your students. Further discounts may be available for large course adoptions.