Introduction to Philosophy Historical Editions

  • Utilitarianism – ed. Andrew Bailey

    Utilitarianism is a classic work of ethical theory, arguably the most persuasive and comprehensible presentation of this widely influential position. While he didn’t invent utilitarianism,…

  • The Apology and Related Dialogues

    Socrates, one of the first of the great philosophers, left no written works. What survives of his thought are second-hand descriptions of his teachings and…

  • Meditations on First Philosophy

    Considered a foundational text in modern philosophy, the Meditations on First Philosophy presents numerous powerful arguments that to this day influence debates in epistemology, the…

  • Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous

    This is a new critical edition of Berkeley’s 1734 (third edition, first 1713) Three Dialogues, a text that is deservedly one of the most challenging…

  • An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding

    Over a series of elegantly written, engaging essays, the Enquiry examines the experiential and psychological sources of meaning and knowledge, the foundations of reasoning about…

  • Beyond the Pleasure Principle

    Beyond the Pleasure Principle is Freud’s most philosophical and speculative work, exploring profound questions of life and death, pleasure and pain. In it Freud introduces…

  • Utilitarianism – ed. Colin Heydt

    John Stuart Mill’s Utilitarianism is a philosophical defense of utilitarianism, a moral theory stating that right actions are those that tend to promote overall happiness.…

  • Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals

    Kant’s Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals, first published in 1785, is still one of the most widely read and influential works of moral philosophy.…

  • Utilitarianism

    This volume provides a reliable text in an inexpensive edition, with notes but no additional editorial apparatus.

  • On Liberty

    Mill predicted that “[t]he Liberty is likely to survive longer than anything else that I have written … because the conjunction of [Harriet Taylor’s] mind…