Tell Me Something I Don’t Know: Dialogues in Epistemology
  • Publication Date: February 28, 2018
  • ISBN: 9781554813568 / 1554813565
  • 200 pages; 7" x 9"
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Tell Me Something I Don’t Know: Dialogues in Epistemology

  • Publication Date: February 28, 2018
  • ISBN: 9781554813568 / 1554813565
  • 200 pages; 7" x 9"

Tell Me Something I Don’t Know is a collection of original dialogues in epistemology, suitable for student readers but also of interest to experts. Familiar problems, theories, and arguments are explored: second-order knowledge, epistemic closure, the preface paradox, skepticism, pragmatic encroachment, the Gettier problem, and more. New ideas on each of these issues are also offered, defended and critiqued, often in humorous and entertaining ways.

Preface: What Is This?

  1. Why Dialogues? Author Meets Critic
  2. Fake Barns and Knowing That You Know: Barney and Arnie Take a Ride
  3. Epistemic Closure: Freddie and Betty at the Zoo
  4. The Preface Paradox: Philosophy Takes a Stand
  5. Skepticism Refuted? A Day in the Life of a BIV
  6. Pragmatic Encroachment: Hanna and Rosana Case the Bank
  7. The Epistemology of Disagreement: My Dinner with Ling
  8. Yet Another Gettier Problem: Philip
  9. The Philosophy of Philosophical Writing Revisited: Departmental Meeting

Appendix on the Purpose and Limits of Philosophical Inquiry: Cartesian Car Care

Michael Veber is Associate Professor of Philosophy at East Carolina University.

  • — Nine unique dialogues designed to introduce and examine many important topics and puzzles of contemporary epistemology, such as:
    • second-order knowledge
    • epistemic closure
    • the preface paradox
    • skepticism
    • pragmatic encroachment
    • the Gettier problem
  • — New ideas and arguments are advanced and critiqued.
  • — Characters and dialogue are injected with humor, and the dialogues are both entertaining and thought-provoking.
  • — Each dialogue begins with an overview of the issues and arguments to be discussed.
  • — Notes in the margins raise discussion questions and remind the reader of important points.
  • — Ideal as a supplement to primary source readings in epistemology.

For a sample chapter of Tell Me Something I Don’t Know, click here. (opens as a PDF).

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