Pink Snow
Homotextual Possibilities in Canadian Fiction
  • Publication Date: March 17, 2003
  • ISBN: 9781551113739 / 1551113732
  • 272 pages; 5¼" x 8¼"

Note on pricing.

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Pink Snow

Homotextual Possibilities in Canadian Fiction

  • Publication Date: March 17, 2003
  • ISBN: 9781551113739 / 1551113732
  • 272 pages; 5¼" x 8¼"

Drawing on recent developments in gay studies and queer theory, Pink Snow: Homotextual Possibilities in Canadian Fiction offers new interpretations that focus on homoerotic resonances in literature. Goldie brings an original, engaging, and sometimes provocative critical perspective to bear on both Canadian classics and less mainstream works. Chapters include:

Wacousta (John Richardson)
As For Me and My House (Sinclair Ross)
Who Has Seen the Wind (W.O. Mitchell)
The Mountain and the Valley (Ernest Buckler)
Beautiful Losers (Leonard Cohen)
Place D’Armes (Scott Symons)
Fifth Business (Robertson Davies)
The Wars (Timothy Findley)
Thy Mother’s Glass (David Watmough)
Funny Boy (Shyam Selvadurai)
Kiss of the Fur Queen (Tomson Highway)

Comments

“The power of Terry Goldie’s Pink Snow is not to show us what we’ve always known, that some Canadian fiction writers have been gay or that they treat gayness in their work. Goldie shows us what it means to read from a gay perspective even when reading such canonical texts as Wacousta, As For Me and My House, Who Has Seen the Wind, The Mountain and the Valley, Beautiful Losers, or Fifth Business. No matter how well you think you already know these Canadian classics, you emerge from the pages of Pink Snow with a sense of fresh insights, and even, to paraphrase Goldie, of the queerness of much of Canadian fiction.” — Russell Brown, University of Toronto at Scarborough

Acknowledgements

CHAPTER 1: Introduction: Who is the Homotextual?
CHAPTER 2: The Guise of Friendship: Wacousta
CHAPTER 3: “Not Precisely Gay in Tone”:
As For Me and My House
CHAPTER 4: Pursuing the Homosocial Ideal:
Who Has Seen the Wind
CHAPTER 5: The Pain of David’s Body:
The Mountain and the Valley
CHAPTER 6: Producing Losers: Beautiful Losers
CHAPTER 7: The Canadian Assoul: Place d’Armes
CHAPTER 8: “How Am I Queer?”: Fifth Business
CHAPTER 9: The Canadian HomoSEXual: The Wars
CHAPTER 10: What is Davey Bryant Doing Here?:
Thy Mother’s Glass
CHAPTER 11: The Funniness of the Funny Boy
CHAPTER 12: Eaten Up: Kiss of the Fur Queen
CHAPTER 13: Conclusion: Guilty Buddies
L’Envoi

Works Cited
Index

Terry Goldie teaches English Literature and Social and Political Thought at York University. He is the author of Fear and Temptation: The Image of the Indigene in Canadian, Australian and New Zealand Literatures (McGill-Queen’s, 1989), editor of In a Queer Country: Gay and Lesbian Studies in the Canadian Context (Arsenalpulp, 2001), and co-editor, with Daniel David Moses, of An Anthology of Canadian Native Literature in English (Oxford, 1998).