The Vampyre and Ernestus Berchtold; or, The Modern Oedipus
  • Publication Date: September 14, 2007
  • ISBN: 9781551117454 / 1551117452
  • 300 pages; 5½" x 8½"

Broadview's ebooks run on the industry-standard Adobe Digital Editions platform. Learn more about ebooks here.

Exam Copy

Academics please note: this title is classified as having a restricted allocation of complimentary copies. However, electronic complimentary copies are readily available for those professors wishing to consider this title for possible course adoption.

Availability: Worldwide

The Vampyre and Ernestus Berchtold; or, The Modern Oedipus

  • Publication Date: September 14, 2007
  • ISBN: 9781551117454 / 1551117452
  • 300 pages; 5½" x 8½"

In 1816, John William Polidori travelled to Geneva as Lord Byron’s personal physician. There they met Mary Godwin (later Shelley) and her lover Percy Shelley and decided to while away a wet summer by writing ghost stories. The only two to complete their stories were Mary Shelley, who published Frankenstein in 1818, and Polidori, whose The Vampyre and Ernestus Berchtold were both published in 1819.

The Vampyre, based on a discarded idea of Byron’s, is the first portrayal of the alluring vampire figure familiar to readers of Bram Stoker and Anne Rice. Ernestus Berchtold scandalously draws on the rumours of Byron’s affair with his half-sister for a Faustian updating of the myth of Oedipus, which it combines with an account of the struggle of Swiss patriots against the Napoleonic invasion.

Along with Polidori’s work, this edition also includes stories read and written by the travellers in the Genevan summer of 1816 and contemporary responses to The Vampyre and Ernestus Berchtold.

Comments

The Vampyre is back again and in very welcome fashion. The editors, including the world’s ranking expert on Polidori, have provided us with a very useful edition of one of the classic Romantic horror stories, together with an odd but compelling version of a ‘modern Oedipus.’ The latter should interest everyone, since, as Freud contends, the Oedipus story ‘might have been ours.’ The edition makes easily accessible a number of the other texts invoked in and produced by the most famous horror- and ghost-writing contest of all time, including works by Byron and P.B. Shelley. Altogether this is a highly useful volume and a not-so-guilty pleasure.” — Ian Balfour, York University

Acknowledgements
Introduction
John William Polidori: A Brief Chronology
A Note on the Texts

The Vampyre: A Tale

Ernestus Berchtold; or,The Modern Œdipus

Appendix A: Ghost Stories

  1. From Tales of the Dead (1813)
    1. “The Family Portraits”
    2. “The Death-Bride”
  2. Lord Byron, “A Fragment” (1819)
  3. P.B. Shelley, “Fragment of a Ghost-Story” (1816)
  4. P.B. Shelley, “Journal at Geneva (including Ghost Stories)” (1816)

Appendix B: Contemporary Reviews

  1. The Vampyre
    1. Edinburgh Monthly Review 1 (1819)
    2. Monthly Review 89 (May-August 1819)
  2. Ernestus Berchtold; or, the Modern Œdipus
    1. Edinburgh Monthly Review 4 (1820)
    2. European Magazine 76 (1819)
    3. Literary Gazette 136 (28 August 1819)

Works Cited and Recommended Reading

The late D.L. Macdonald was Professor of English at the University of Calgary.

Kathleen Scherf is Professor and Dean in the Faculty of Communication and Culture, University of Calgary. They are the co-editors of the Broadview editions of Mary Wollstonecraft’s The Vindications (1997), Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1999), and Matthew Gregory Lewis’s The Monk: A Romance (2004).