The Logic of Our Language
An Introduction to Symbolic Logic
  • Publication Date: November 4, 2014
  • ISBN: 9781554811847 / 1554811848
  • 352 pages; 7" x 9"

Broadview's ebooks run on the industry-standard Adobe Digital Editions platform. Learn more about ebooks here.

Exam Copy

Availability: Worldwide

The Logic of Our Language

An Introduction to Symbolic Logic

  • Publication Date: November 4, 2014
  • ISBN: 9781554811847 / 1554811848
  • 352 pages; 7" x 9"

The Logic of Our Language teaches the practical and everyday application of formal logic. Rather than overwhelming the reader with abstract theory, Jackson and McLeod show how the skills developed through the practice of logic can help us to better understand our own language and reasoning processes.

The authors’ goal is to draw attention to the patterns and logical structures inherent in our spoken and written language by teaching the reader how to translate English sentences into formal symbols. Other logical tools, including truth tables, truth trees, and natural deduction, are then introduced as techniques for examining the properties of symbolized sentences and assessing the validity of arguments. A substantial number of practice questions are offered both within the book itself and as interactive activities on a companion website.

Comments

The Logic of Our Language, by Rodger L. Jackson and Melanie L. McLeod, is an excellent book. It has perhaps the most elusive of virtues, the one at which all logic books seem to aim, and so few achieve: it is abundantly accessible, but it is not in the least dumbed-down. Furthermore, Jackson and McLeod’s approach to the classic topics in formal logic really is fresh and often insightful. This is the best introductory logic book I have read in the last ten years, and the best examples since Lewis Carroll.” — Nathaniel Nicol, Washington State University

“This text shows how to become fluent in the logic within language, using a carefully organized, step-by-step approach. Well-placed summaries of key points and extensive exercises assist the reader in developing insight and confidence.” — Peter Amato, Drexel University

Instructor’s Preface

UNIT ONE: WHAT DOES IT MEAN?
Patterns of Statements
Chapter One: Logic and Languages
Chapter Two: Names and Predicates
Chapter Three: Quantifiers
Chapter Four: Negations and Conjunctions
Chapter Five: Conditionals and Disjunctions
Chapter Six: Biconditionals and Identity
Unit One Review
Unit One: Answers to Selected Problems

UNIT TWO: IS IT TRUE?
Properties and Relations of Statements
Chapter Seven: Connectives and Truth Tables
Chapter Eight: Truth Trees
Chapter Nine: Relationships between Statements
Chapter Ten: Reintroducing Names, Predicates, Quantifiers, and Identity
Unit Two Review
Unit Two: Answers to Selected Problems

UNIT THREE: IS IT VALID?
Patterns and Properties of Arguments
Chapter Eleven: Arguments, Trees, and Tables
Chapter Twelve: Method of Proof
Chapter Thirteen: Proof Rules for Quantifiers
Unit Three Review
Unit Three: Answers to Selected Problems

Postscript: Logic in Real Life

Index

Rodger L. Jackson is Professor of Philosophy at Richard Stockton College and Melanie L. McLeod is an instructor of philosophy at Richard Stockton College.

The companion sites include content for both instructors and students.

The instructor site has additional questions for practice or quizzing (some of which can be uploaded to Learning Management Systems such as Blackboard, Moodle, etc.). An access code to the website is included with all examination copies.

The student companion site features interactive questions corresponding to the exercises provided throughout the book. An access code to the website is included with all new copies.