The Broadview Anthology of Expository Prose – Third Edition
  • Publication Date: August 29, 2016
  • ISBN: 9781554813339 / 1554813336
  • 1080 pages; 6½" x 9"

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The Broadview Anthology of Expository Prose – Third Edition

  • Publication Date: August 29, 2016
  • ISBN: 9781554813339 / 1554813336
  • 1080 pages; 6½" x 9"

The third edition of this anthology has been substantially revised and updated for a contemporary American audience; a selection of classic essays from earlier eras has been retained, but the emphasis is very much on twenty-first-century expository writing. Works of different lengths and levels of difficulty are represented, as are narrative, descriptive and persuasive essays—and, new to this edition, lyric essays. For the new edition there are also considerably more short pieces than ever before; a number of op-ed pieces are included, as are pieces from blogs and from online news sources. The representation of academic writing from several disciplines has been increased—and in some cases the anthology also includes news reports presenting the results of academic research to a general audience. Also new to this edition are essays from a wide range of the most celebrated essayists of the modern era—from James Baldwin, Susan Sontag, Joan Didion, and Annie Dillard to Eula Biss and Ta-Nehisi Coates.

The anthology remains broad in its thematic coverage, but certain themes receive special emphasis—notably, issues of race, class, and culture in twenty-first century America.

For the new edition the headnotes have been expanded, providing students with more information as to the context in which each piece was written. Questions and suggestions for discussion have been moved online to the instructor website.

Comments

Comments on previous editions:

“My students’ responses to the readings have sparked meaningful and productive conversations about culture, education, and our ways of viewing the world. To my delight, at the end of a typical meeting we are left with even more questions than when we began. This text fosters students’ growth as inquisitive, critical readers and opens the doorway to future academic work.” — Alixandra V. Krzemien, Canisius College

“What a wonderful and insightful collection of essays. My writing courses improved by leaps and bounds when I adopted the first edition. … [W]ith a diverse and engaging range of essays, The Broadview Anthology of Expository Prose challenges writers to read beyond the purview of their experience and knowledge so that their writing can consider and cross more horizons. This collection invites students into serious academic discourse via groundbreaking essays by prominent and influential voices from within and without academia; the second edition will prepare writers to understand how any topic or discipline cultivates networks of dialogue across popular, lyrical, scholarly, experimental, and theoretical styles. Don’t be surprised when students read more than the assigned material from The Broadview Anthology, as was the case when I adopted the first edition for my courses; the accessible organization and appeal of this book make it a useful resource for ongoing learning and research.” — Beth Staley, West Virginia University

“For the second edition, the editors of The Broadview Anthology of Expository Prose have managed to make significant improvements to what was already an above-average prose anthology. A particular strength of the new edition is the inclusion of paired articles (two articles on the same topic but directed toward different audiences), which provides students with the opportunity to explore the concepts of audience, voice, and purpose in writing.” — Lisa Salem-Wiseman, Humber College

The Broadview Anthology of Expository Prose is one of the best essay anthologies I have seen. The remarkable diversity of the essays covers an impressive range of authors, styles, topics, and viewpoints. Included are essays from the humanities, the sciences, and the social sciences; scholarly essays, literary essays, and popular essays; traditional essays and contemporary ones; short essays and long ones; essays in a wide range of tones and of voices, by men and women from a wide range of backgrounds. An added bonus is the historical range of prose styles from the seventeenth to the twenty-first centuries. The quality of the essays also deserves high praise; again and again these readings demonstrate how the most common questions may provoke uncommon insights. Many selections have a sharp edge but they challenge a reader’s mindset without being confrontational. The topics make one take notice; the essays then lead the reader through the complexities of analysis. This anthology of significant, incisive, diverse essays should make a significant contribution to the recognition of the essay as a vitally important genre—and of essay writing as a vitally important literary and argumentative art.” — Paul D. Farkas, Metropolitan State College

PREFACE
CONTENTS BY SUBJECT
CONTENTS BY RHETORICAL CATEGORY AND MEDIUM

LUCRETIUS

LUCIUS ANNAEIUS SENECA

    Epistle 47 [On Slavery]

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

JOHN DONNE

MARGARET CAVENDISH

SAMUEL JOHNSON

LADY MARY WORTLEY MONTAGU

  • from The Turkish Embassy Letters
    • from Letter 30
    • from Letter 43

JONATHAN SWIFT

  • A Modest Proposal

MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT

  • To M. Talleyrand-Périgord, Late Bishop of Autun

HARRIET MARTINEAU

CHARLES LYELL

ELIZABETH CADY STANTON

  • Seneca Falls Keynote Address

HENRY DAVID THOREAU

  • Civil Disobedience

FREDERICK DOUGLASS

  • from Fourth of July Oration

CHARLES DARWIN

  • from On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection

ELIZA M.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

  • Second Inaugural Address

MARK TWAIN

  • from Life on the Mississippi

OSCAR WILDE

  • from The Decay of Lying

W.E.B. DU BOIS

  • A Mild Suggestion

JOSÉ VASCONCELOS

  • Books I read Sitting and Books I Read Standing

ZORA NEALE HURSTON

  • How It Feels to Be Colored Me

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT

  • First Inaugural Address

VIRGINIA WOOLF

  • from Three Guineas
    The Death of the Moth

GEORGE ORWELL

  • Shooting an Elephant
    Politics and the English Language

WINSTON CHURCHILL

JAMES BALDWIN

  • Stranger in the Village

JORGE LUIS BORGES

  • Borges and I

STANLEY MILGRAM

  • from Behavioral Study of Obedience

IAN NICHOLSON

  • from “Torture at Yale”: Experimental Subjects, Laboratory Torment and the “Rehabilitation” of Milgram’s “Obedience to Authority” — WEBSITE

RAYMOND WILLIAMS

MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.

  • Letter from Birmingham Jail

NELSON MANDELA

  • from An Ideal for Which I am Prepared to Die

JOAN DIDION

  • On Morality
  • On Going Home

ROLAND BARTHES

  • The World of Wrestling

JOHN BERGER

  • Photographs of Agony
  • Turner and the Barber’s Shop

SUSAN SONTAG

  • from Freak Show
  • from Regarding the Pain of Others

ANNIE DILLARD

  • On Foot in Virginia’s Roanoke Valley
  • from For the Time Being

ROSARIO FERRÉ

  • On Destiny, Language, and Translation, or, Ophelia Adrift in the C. & O. Canal

MICHEL FOUCAULT

  • from The History of Sexuality [The Perverse Implantation]

PETER SINGER

  • from Animal Liberation

LESLIE MARMON SILKO

  • Language and Literature from a Pueblo Indian Perspection

AUDRE LORDE

  • Poetry is Not a Luxury
  • The Uses of Anger: Women Responding to Racisim

ADRIENNE RICH

  • Claiming an Education
  • from Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence

ALICE MUNRO

  • What Is Real?

ELAINE SHOWALTER

  • Representing Ophelia: Women, Madness, and the Responsibilities of Feminist Criticism

NGUGI WA THIONG’O

  • from Decolonising the Mind

JUDY RUIZ

  • Oranges and Sweet Sister Boy

ANATOLE BROYARD

  • Intoxicated by My Illness

SALMAN RUSHDIE

  • Is Nothing Sacred?

SHERMAN ALEXIE

  • Indian Education

ANNE CARSON

  • from Short Talks
    • Introduction
    • On Parmenides
    • On Sleep Stones
    • On Walking Backwards
    • On the Total Collection
    • On Sunday Dinner with Father

HENRY LOUIS GATES JR.

  • from The Passing of Anatole Broyard

EMILY MARTIN

  • The Egg and the Sperm: How Science Has Constructed a Romance Based on Steretypical Male-Female Roles

JAMAICA KINCAID

  • On Seeing England for the First Time

DAVID CARD AND ALAN B. KRUEGER

  • from Minimum Wages and Employment: A Case Study of the Fast-Food Industry in New Jersey and Pennsylvania

BELL HOOKS

  • In Our Glory: Photography and Black Life

JEFFREY JEROME COHEN

  • from Monster Culture (Seven Theses)

ALICE BECK KEHOE

  • Transcribing Insima, a Blackfoot “Old Lady”

JUDITH RICH HARRIS

RICHARD RODRIGUEZ

  • from Crossing Borders [San Diego and Tijuana
  • from Darling

THOMAS HURKA

  • Philosophy, Morality, and The English Patient

PHILIP GOUREVITCH

  • from We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed with Our Families

BARBARA EHRENREICH

  • from Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting by in America

MARGARET ATWOOD

MIRIAM TOEWS

  • A Father’s Faith

MARK BEEMAN, ET AL.

DAVID FOSTER WALLACE

  • Consider the Lobster

EULA BISS

  • from The Pain Scale
  • Time and Distance Overcome

BINYAVANGA WAINAINA

  • How to Write about Africa

CYNTHIA OZICK

  • Highbrow Blues

MALCOLM GLADWELL

  • None of the Above: What I.Q. Doesn’t Tell You about Race

ADAM GOPNIK

  • The Corrections: Abridgement, Enrichment, and the Nature of Art

DAVID SEDARIS

  • Guy Walks into a Bar Car

AI WEIWEI

  • Heartless
  • Let Us Forget

LUIS W. ALVAREZ, WALTER ALVAREZ, FRANK ASARO, AND HELEN V. MICHEL

ELIZABETH KOLBERT

BARACK OBAMA

  • A More Perfect Union
  • Remarks by the President in Eulogy for the Honorable Reverend Clementa Pinckney

MARINA KEEGAN

  • Why We Care about Whales

JONATHAN SAFRAN FOER

  • from Eating Animals

RICHARD H. THALER AND CASS R SUNSTEIN

  • from Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness

NATALIA V. CZAP, HANS J. CZAP, GARY D. LYNNE, AND MARK E. BURBACH

  • Empathy Nudging as a New Component of Conservation Programs

RYKA AOKI

  • On Living Well and Coming Free

J WALLACE

  • The Manly Art of Pregnancy

NEAL MCLEOD

ZADIE SMITH

  • Generation Why

MAGGIE NELSON

  • from Bluets
  • from The Art of Cruelty

AMY SCHALET

  • The Sleepover Question
  • from Not Under My Roof: Parents, Teens, and the Culture of Sex

JEANETTE WINTERSON

  • from Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?

PICO IYER

  • The Terminal Check

STEPHEN GREENBLATT

  • The Answer Man

ETHAN KROSS, ET AL

  • from Facebook Use Predicts Declines in Subjective Well-Being in Young Adults

ANONYMOUS [THE ECONOMIST]

  • Facebook Is Bad for You: Get a Life!

DAVID SHIELDS

  • I Can’t Stop Thinking through What Other People Are Thinking

IRA BOADWAY

  • NBA Refs Learned They Were Racist, and That Made Them Less Racist

ANN WROE

Three Obituaries

  • Chester Nez
  • Nancy Reagan: Keeping Control
  • Amjad Sabri: Hate and Love

ANTHONY S. TRAVIS

  • The Accidental Discovery of Mauve

REBECCA SOLNIT

  • Climate Change Is Violence
  • The Mother of All Questions

GLORIA GALLOWAY

  • Dr. Bjorn Lomborg Argues the Climate Change Fight Isn’t Worth the Cost

CLAUDIA RANKINE

  • from Citizen: An American Lyric [On Serena Williams]
  • The Condition of Black Life Is One of Mourning

NIKOLE HANNAH-JONES

  • School Segregation: The Continuing Tragedy of Ferguson

TA-NEHISI COATES

  • The Case for Reparations

NICHOLAS KRISTOF

  • When Whites Just Don’t Get It
  • When Whites Just Don’t Get It, Part 6

LAWRENCE G. PROULX

  • A Group You Can Safely Attack

ROXANE GAY

  • Bad Feminist: Take One

WILLIAM H. FREY

  • Census Shows Modest Declines in Black-white Segregation

ROBERT D. PUTNAM

  • from Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis

BILL SHORE

  • Stolen Future

JILL LEPORE

  • from Richer and Poorer: Accounting for Inequality

JAMES SUROWIECKI

  • A Fair Day’s Wage

LAUREN A. RIVERA

  • Guess Who Doesn’t Fit in at Work

JONATHAN M. METZL AND KENNETH T. MACLEISH

  • from Mental Illness, Mass Shootings, and the Politics of American Firearms

ATUL GAWANDE

  • from Overkill

NATHANAEL JOHNSON

  • Is There a Moral Case for Meat?

MICHAEL POLLAN

  • Why “Natural” Doesn’t Mean Anything Anymore

LAILA LALAMI

  • My Life as a Muslim in the West’s “Gray Zone”

SARAH KURCHAK

  • Autistic People Are Not Tragedies

EMILY NUSSBAUM

  • The Price is Right: What Advertising Does to TV

NATHANIEL RICH

KATY WALDMAN

  • from There Once Was a Girl: Against the False Narratives of Anorexia

DAWN MARIE DOW

  • The Deadly Challenges of Raising African American Boys: Navigating the Controlling Image of the “Thug”

MARILYNNE ROBINSON

  • Fear

ALEX BOZIKOVIC

  • Chicago Architect Aims to Repair Relations between Police, Residents

TEJU COLE

  • A Too-Perfect Picture

MALIK JALAL

  • I’m on the Kill List. This Is What It Feels Like to Be Hunted by Drones

JACOB BROGAN

  • Don’t Anthropomorphize Inky the Octopus!

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
INDEX

Laura Buzzard and Don LePan are co-authors of The Broadview Pocket Glossary of Literary Terms (2014) and of How to Be Good with Words (forthcoming, 2017); Nora Ruddock and Alexandria Stuart are, respectively, Developmental Editor and Assistant Editor, at Broadview Press.

The instructor site has additional questions and exercises as well as background material on certain essays.

The student companion site has additional readings, interactive writing exercises, and discussion questions. An access code to the website is included with all new copies. If you purchased a used copy or are missing your passcode for this site, please click here to purchase a code online.