The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: One-Volume Compact Edition
The Medieval Period through the Twenty First Century
  • Publication Date: April 20, 2015
  • ISBN: 9781554812547 / 1554812542
  • 2112 pages; 7¾" x 9¼"

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The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: One-Volume Compact Edition

The Medieval Period through the Twenty First Century

  • Publication Date: April 20, 2015
  • ISBN: 9781554812547 / 1554812542
  • 2112 pages; 7¾" x 9¼"

In all six of its volumes The Broadview Anthology of British Literature presents British literature in a truly distinctive light. Fully grounded in sound literary and historical scholarship, the anthology takes a fresh approach to many canonical authors, and includes a wide selection of work by lesser-known writers. The anthology also provides wide-ranging coverage of the worldwide connections of British literature, and it pays attention throughout to issues of race, gender, class, and sexual orientation. It includes comprehensive introductions to each period, providing in each case an overview of the historical and cultural as well as the literary background. It features accessible and engaging headnotes for all authors, extensive explanatory annotations, and an unparalleled number of illustrations and contextual materials. Innovative, authoritative and comprehensive, The Broadview Anthology of British Literature has established itself as a leader in the field.

The full anthology comprises six bound volumes, together with an extensive website component that includes hundreds of additional readings and other interactive material. The website content has been edited, annotated, and designed according to the same high standards as the bound book component of the anthology, and is accessible by using the passcode obtained with the purchase of one or more of the bound volumes.

For those seeking an even more streamlined anthology than the two-volume Concise Edition, The Broadview Anthology of British Literature is now available in a compact single-volume version. The edition features the same high quality of introductions, annotations, contextual materials, and illustrations found in the full anthology, and it complements an ample offering of canonical works with a vibrant selection of less-canonical pieces.

The compact single-volume edition also includes a substantial website component, providing for much greater flexibility. An increasing number of works from the full six-volume anthology (or from its website component) are also being made available in stand-alone Broadview Anthology of British Literature editions that can be bundled with the anthology.

Comments

Comments on The Broadview Anthology of British Literature:

“ … sets a new standard by which all other anthologies of British Literature will now have to be measured.” — Graham Hammill, SUNY Buffalo

“With the publication of the Broadview Anthology of British Literature, teachers and students in survey and upper-level undergraduate courses have a compelling alternative to the established anthologies by Norton and Longman. … This is a very real intellectual, as well as pedagogical, achievement.” — Nicholas Watson, Harvard University

“ … an excellent anthology. Good selections for my purposes (including some nice surprises), just the right level of annotation, affordable—and a hit with my students. I will definitely use it again.” — Ira Nadel, University of British Columbia

NOTE: The online component of the anthology offers a substantial number of additional readings, edited to the same standards as the bound book. Online readings appear in the hyperlinked sections below; to download these readings, please follow the hyperlinks to the BABL online resources site and log in using your passcode.

Preface

Acknowledgments

THE MEDIEVAL PERIOD

  • THE MEDIEVAL PERIOD
    • History, Narrative, Culture
      Before the Norman Conquest

      • Celts in Medieval Britain and Ireland
        Roman Britain
        Early Anglo-Saxon Britain
        Celtic Culture
        Celtic Christianity
        Later Anglo-Saxon Britain
        Invasion and Unification
    • England after the Norman Conquest
      • The Normans and Feudalism
        Henry II and an International Culture
        Wales, Scotland, Ireland: Norman Invasions and Their Aftermath
        The Thirteenth Century
        The English Monarchy
        Cultural Expression in the Fourteenth Century
        Fifteenth-Century Transitions
        Language and Prosody
  • HISTORY OF THE LANGUAGE AND OF PRINT AND MANUSCRIPT CULTURE
  • BEDE (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • from Ecclesiastical History of the English People
      • A Description of the Island of Britain and Its Inhabitants
        The Coming of the English to Britain
        The Life and Conversion of Edwin, King of Northumbria; the Faith of
        the East Angles
        Abbess Hild of Whitby; the Miraculous Poet Cædmon
        Cædmon’s Hymn in Old and Modern English
  • EARLY IRISH LYRICS
    • The First Satire
      [A Bé Find, in rega lim] Fair lady, will you go with me
      [Messe ocus Pangur Bán] Me and white Pangur
      [Is acher in gáith innocht] The wind is wild tonight
      [Techt do Róim] Going to Rome?
      The Lament of the Old Woman of Beare
  • THE DREAM OF THE ROOD
  • CONTEXTS: THE CRISES OF THE FOURTEENTH CENTURY
    • The Great Famine
      • from Anonymous (the “Monk of Malmesbury”), Life of Edward the Second
    • The Hundred Years’ War
      • from Jean Froissart, Chronicle
        from Prince Edward, Letter to the People of London
    • The Black Death
      • from Ralph of Shrewsbury, Letter (17 August 1348)
        from Henry Knighton, Chronicle
    • The Uprising of 1381 (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
      • from Regulations, London (1350)
        from Statute of Laborers (1351)
        from Statute (1363)
        from Jean Froissart, Chronicle, Account of a Sermon by John Ball
        John Ball, Letter to the Common People of Essex, 1381
        from Henry Knighton, Chronicle
  • SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT
    • IN CONTEXT: Illustrations from the Original Manuscript
  • CONTEXTS: RELIGIOUS AND SPIRITUAL LIFE
    • Celtic Christianity
      Church and Cathedral
      Religion for All: The Apostle’s Creed, the Pater Noster, and the Hail Mary

      • The Apostle’s Creed
        The Pater Noster
        The Hail Mary
    • from Robert Manning of Brunne, Handlyng Synne
      from William of Pagula, Priest’s Eye
      from The Canons of the Fourth Lateran Council
      Sin, Corruption, and Indulgence

      • from William Langland, The Vision of Piers the Plowman (B-text)
        • from Passus 1
          Passus 5
          from Passus 7
      • from Thomas Wimbleton, Sermon
    • Lollardy
      • from Account of the Heresy Trial of Margery Baxter
    • The Persecution of the Jews
      • from Thomas of Monmouth, The Life and Miracles of St. William of Norwich
        from Roger Howden, Chronicle
        from Ordinances of the Jews
        from Charter of King John to the Jews
        from Ordinances of Henry III
        Edward I’s Order
  • MEDIEVAL DRAMA
  • EVERYMAN
  • SIR THOMAS MALORY

THE RENAISSANCE AND THE EARLY SEVENTEENTH CENTURY

  • THE RENAISSANCE AND THE EARLY SEVENTEENTH CENTURY
    • Humanism
      Scientific Inquiry
      The Reformation in England
      Wales, Scotland, Ireland
      Edward VI, Mary I, and Elizabeth I
      Elizabeth I and Gender
      Homoeroticism and Cross-Dressing
      Economy and Society in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries
      “The Round Earth’s Imagined Corners”
      The Stuarts and the Civil Wars
      Literary Genres
      Literature in Prose and the Development of Print Culture
      Poetry
      The Drama
      The English Language in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries
  • HISTORY OF THE LANGUAGE AND OF PRINT CULTURE
  • THE ELIZABETHAN SONNET AND LYRIC
    • The Continental Background
      • Francesco Petrarch
        • from Rime Sparse
          • 134 (“Pace non trovo et non ò da far guerra”)
            134 (“I find no peace and all my war is done”)
            140 (“Amor, che nel penser mio vive et regna”)
            140 (“Love, that doth reign and live within my thought”)
            189 (“Passa la nave mia colma d’oblio”)
            189 (“My galley chargèd with forgetfulness”)
            190 (“Una candida cerva sopra l’erba”)
            190 (“Whoso list to hunt, I know where is a hind”)
      • Gaspara Stampa (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
        • 132 (“Quando io dimando nel mio pianto Amore”)
          132 (“When in my weeping I inquire of Love”)
      • Joachim Du Bellay (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
        • 113 (“Si nostre vie est moins qu’une journée”)
          113 (“If this, our life, be less than but a day”)
      • Pierre de Ronsard (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
        • (“Je vouldroy bien richement jaunissant”)
          (“I would in rich and golden coloured rain”)
          (“Quand vous serez bien vielle, au soir à la chandelle”)
          (“When you are very old, by candle’s flame”)
      • Samuel Daniel (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
        • from Delia
          • 6 (“Fair is my love, and cruel as she’s fair”)
            28 (“Raising my hopes on hills of high desire”)
            33 (“When men shall find thy flower, thy glory pass”)
      • Michael Drayton (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
        • from Idea
          • 6 (“How many paltry, foolish, painted things”)
            61 (“Since there’s no help, come let us kiss and part”)
            63 (“Truce, gentle Love, a parley now I crave”)
      • William Shakespeare
        • from Romeo and Juliet (Act 1, Scene 5)
      • Sir John Davies
        • from Gulling Sonnets
          • 3 (“What eagle can behold her sun-bright eye”)
      • John Davies of Hereford (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
        • from The Scourge of Villany
          • (“If there were, oh! an Hellespont of cream”)
      • Richard Barnfield (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
        • from Cynthia
          • 14 (“Here, hold this glove (this milk-white cheverel glove)”)
            17 (“Cherry-lipped Adonis in his snowy shape”)
      • George Gascoigne
        • Gascoigne’s Lullaby
      • Anonymous
        • Ode (“Absence, hear thou my protestation”)
  • EDMUND SPENSER
    • from The Faerie Queene
    • Letter to Sir Walter Ralegh on The Faerie Queene
      IN CONTEXT: The Redcrosse Knight (Illustration)
      IN CONTEXT: Christian Armor

      • from Paul’s Epistle to the Ephesians, 6.11–17 (Geneva Bible)
        from Desiderius Erasmus, Enchiridion militis Christiani [Handbook of the Christian Soldier]
    • IN CONTEXT: Spirituality and The Faerie Queene
      • Heading to the Song of Solomon (Geneva Bible)
    • from Amoretti
      • 1 (“Happy ye leaves when as those lilly hands”)
        3 (“The soverayne beauty which I doo admyre”)
        6 (“Be nought dismayd that her unmovèd mind”)
        15 (“Ye tradefull Merchants, that with weary toyle”)
        22 (“This holy season fit to fast and pray”)
        26 (“Sweet is the Rose, but growes upon a brere”)
        34 (“Lyke as a ship that through the Ocean wyde”)
        37 (“What guyle is this, that those her golden tresses”)
        54 (“Of this worlds Theatre in which we stay”)
        64 (“Comming to kisse her lyps, (such grace I found)”)
        67 (“Lyke as a hunstman after weary chace”)
        68 (“Most glorious Lord of lyfe that on this day”)
        69 (“The famous warriors of the anticke world”)
        70 (“Fresh spring the herald of loves mighty king”)
        74 (“Most happy letters fram’d by skilfull trade”)
        75 (“One day I wrote her name upon the strand”)
        80 (“After so long a race as I have run”)
        82 (“Joy of my life, full oft for loving you”)
        89 (“Lyke as the Culver on the barèd bough”)
    • Epithalamion (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
  • ELIZABETH I, QUEEN OF ENGLAND
    • Written on a Wall at Woodstock
      Written in Her French Psalter
      The Doubt of Future Foes
      On Monsieur’s Departure
      When I Was Fair and Young
      To Our Most Noble and Virtuous Queen Katherine
      To the Troops at Tilbury
      Two Letters from Elizabeth to Catherine de Bourbon
      On Marriage
      On Mary, Queen of Scots
      On Mary’s Execution
      The Golden Speech
      IN CONTEXT: The Defeat of the Spanish Armada
  • CONTEXTS: CULTURE: A PORTFOLIO
    • Music
      • from Izaak Walton, The Compleat Angler
    • Painting
      • from Nicholas Hilliard, A Treatise Concerning the Art of Limning
        from A Letter to F.P. Verney from the Countess of Sussex
        Oliver Cromwell, Instructions to His Painter, as Reported by George Vertue, Notebooks
    • Games and Pastimes
      • Selected Illustrations
    • Food and Drink
      • from An Anonymous Venetian Official Traveling in England, A Relation, or Rather a True Account, of the Island of England
        from Fynes Moryson, Itinerary
        Selected Illustrations
        from Sarah Longe, Mrs. Sarah Longe Her Receipt Book
        from William Harrison, Chronologie
    • Children and Education
      • Selected Illustrations
    • The Supernatural and the Miraculous
      • from Reginald Scot, The Discovery of Witchcraft
        from George Gifford, A Discourse of the Subtle Practices of Devils by Witches and Sorcerers
        from Joseph Hall, Characters of Virtues and Vices
        from Sir John Harington, “Account of an Audience with King James I,” as recorded in Nugae Antiquae
        Anonymous Broadsheet, “The Form and Shape of a Monstrous Child”
    • Crime
      • from “A True Report of the late Horrible Murder Committed by William Sherwood”
    • Print Culture
  • AEMILIA LANYER
    • To the Virtuous Reader
      from Salve Deus Rex Judæorum

      • “Invocation”
        “Eve’s Apology in Defense of Women”
    • The Description of Cooke-ham
      To the Doubtful Reader
  • WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
    • Sonnets
      • 1 (“From fairest creatures we desire increase”)
        2 (“When forty winters shall besiege thy brow”)
        12 (“When I do count the clock that tells the time”)
        15 (“When I consider everything that grows”)
        16 (“But wherefore do not you a mightier way”)
        18 (“Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?”)
        19 (“Devouring time, blunt thou the lion’s paws”)
        20 (“A woman’s face with nature’s own hand painted”)
        23 (“As an unperfect actor on the stage”)
        29 (“When in disgrace with fortune and men’s eyes”)
        30 (“When to the sessions of sweet silent thought”)
        33 (“Full many a glorious morning have I seen”)
        35 (“No more be grieved at that which thou hast done”)
        36 (“Let me confess that we two must be twain”)
        55 (“Not marble, nor the gilded monuments”)
        60 (“Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore”)
        64 (“When I have seen by time’s fell hand defaced”)
        65 (“Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea”)
        71 (“No longer mourn for me when I am dead”)
        73 (“That time of year thou mayst in me behold”)
        74 (“But be contented when that fell arrest”)
        80 (“O how I faint when I of you do write”)
        87 (“Farewell—thou art too dear for my possessing”)
        93 (“So shall I live supposing thou art true”)
        94 (“They that have power to hurt and will do none”)
        97 (“How like a winter hath my absence been”)
        98 (“From you have I been absent in the spring”)
        105 (“Let not my love be called idolatry”)
        106 (“When in the chronicle of wasted time”)
        109 (“O never say that I was false of heart”)
        110 (“Alas, ’tis true, I have gone here and there”)
        116 (“Let me not to the marriage of true minds”)
        117 (“Accuse me thus: that I have scanted all”)
        127 (“In the old age black was not counted fair”)
        128 (“How oft when thou, my music, music play’st”)
        129 (“Th’expense of spirit in a waste of shame”)
        130 (“My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun”)
        135 (“Whoever hath her wish, thou hast thy Will”)
        136 (“If thy soul check thee that I come so near”)
        138 (“When my love swears that she is made of truth”)
        143 (“Lo, as a careful housewife runs to catch”)
        144 (“Two loves I have, of comfort and despair”)
        146 (“Poor soul, the centre of my sinful earth”)
        147 (“My love is as a fever, longing still”)
        153 (“Cupid laid by his brand, and fell asleep”)
        154 (“The little love-god lying once asleep”)
    • Twelfth Night
    • Merchant of Venice (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • King Lear (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
      IN CONTEXT: The Shakespearean Theater (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

        • The Swan Theatre
          Titus Andronicus in Performance
          The Plot of an Elizabethan Play
          Early Editions of Shakespeare’s
  • LADY MARY WROTH
    • from Pamphilia to Amphilanthus
      • 1 (“When night’s black mantle could most darkness prove”)
        6 (“My pain, still smothered in my grieved breast”)
        7 (“Love leave to urge, thou know’st thou hast the hand”)
        13 (“Dear, famish not what you your self gave food”)
        14 (“Am I thus conquered? have I lost the powers”)
        15 (“Truly poor Night thou welcome art to me”)
        22 (“Like to the Indians, scorched with the sun”)
        23 (“When every one to pleasing pastime hies”)
        35 (“False hope which feeds but to destroy, and spill”)
    • from A Crown of Sonnets Dedicated to Love
      • 77 (“In this strange labyrinth how shall I turn?”)
    • Railing Rhymes Returned upon the Author by Mistress Mary Wroth
      IN CONTEXT: The Occasion of “Railing Rhymes”

      • Edward Denny, Baron of Waltham, To Pamphilia from the father-in-law of Seralius
  • ROBERT HERRICK
    • The Argument of His Book
      Delight in Disorder
      Corinna’s Going A-Maying
      To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time
      The Hock-Cart, or Harvest Home
      Upon Julia’s Clothes
  • JOHN MILTON
    • L’Allegro
      Il Penseroso
      Lycidas (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
      Sonnets

    • from Areopagitica: A Speech of Mr. John Milton for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing, to the Parliament of England
    • from Paradise Lost
      • The Verse
        Argument to Book 1
        Book 1
        Argument to Book 2
        Book 2
        Argument to Book 3
        from Book 3
        Argument to Book 4
        Book 4
        Argument to Book 5
        Argument to Book 6
        Argument to Book 7
        from Book 7
        Argument to Book 8
        Argument to Book 9
        Book 9
        Argument to Book 10
        Book 10
        Argument to Book 11
        Argument to Book 12
        from Book 12
    • IN CONTEXT: Illustrating Paradise Lost

THE RESTORATION AND THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

  • THE RESTORATION AND THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
    • Religion, Government, and Party Politics
      Empiricism, Skepticism, and Religious Dissent
      Industry, Commerce, and the Middle Class
      Ethical Dilemmas in a Changing Nation
      Print Culture
      Poetry
      Theater
      The Novel
      The Development of the English Language
  • HISTORY OF THE LANGUAGE AND OF PRINT CULTURE
  • SAMUEL PEPYS
    • from The Diary
      IN CONTEXT: Other Accounts of the Great Fire

      • from The London Gazette
  • APHRA BEHN
    • The Disappointment
      Oroonoko: or, The Royal Slave. A True History
  • ALEXANDER POPE
    • from An Essay on Criticism
      The Rape of the Lock: An Heroi-Comical Poem in Five Cantos
      from An Essay on Man

      • The Design
        Epistle 1
        Epistle 2
  • CONTEXTS: PRINT CULTURE, STAGE CULTURE (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • from Nahum Tate, The History of King Lear
      from Colley Cibber, An Apology for the Life of Mr. Colley Cibber
      from Jeremy Collier, A Short View of the Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage

      • Introduction
        from Chapter 1: The Immodesty of the Stage
        from Chapter 4: The Stage-Poets Make Their Principal Persons Vicious and Reward Them at the End of the Play
    • from Joseph Addison, The Spectator No. 18
      from The Licensing Act of 1737
      from The Statute of Anne
      from James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson
      Joseph Addison, The Tatler No. 224
      from Samuel Johnson, The Idler No. 30
      from Clara Reeve, The Progress of Romance
      from James Lackington, Memoirs of the Forty-Five First Years of the Life of James Lackington, Bookseller
      from Thomas Erskine, Speech as Prosecution in the Seditious-Libel Trial of Thomas Williams for Publishing Age of Reason, by Thomas Paine
  • THOMAS GRAY
    • Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard
  • CONTEXTS: TRANSATLANTIC CURRENTS (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • Slavery
      • from Richard Ligon, A True & Exact History of the Island of Barbados
        from John Woolman, “Considerations on the Keeping of Negroes”
        from John Bicknell and Thomas Day, “The Dying Negro, A Poem” (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
        from William Cowper, The Task (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

        • from Book 2
          from Book 4
      • Hannah More, “Slavery: A Poem”
        Ann Yearsley, “A Poem on the Inhumanity of the Slave-Trade”
    • Immigration to America
      • from Ebenezer Cooke, The Sotweed Factor (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
        from William Moraley, The Infortunate: The Voyage and Adventures of William Moraley, an Indentured Servant
        from Gottlieb Mittelberger, Journey to Pennsylvania (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
        from Lady Lucan, “On the Present State of Ireland”
        from Commissioners of the Customs in Scotland, Report on the Examination
        of the Emigrants from the Counties of Caithness and Sutherland on Board the Ship
        Bachelor of Leith Bound to Wilmington in North Carolina

        from Benjamin Franklin, Information to Those Who Would Remove to America
        from J. Hector St. John Crèvecoeur, Letters from an American Farmer
        from Anonymous, Look Before You Leap

        • from The Preface
      • from Israel Potter, Life and Remarkable Adventures of Israel R. Potter (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • General Wolfe and the Fall of Quebec
      • from Tobias Smollett “Anecdotes Relating to the Battle of Quebec”
        from Thomas Cary, “Abram’s Plains” (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
        from Horace Walpole, Memoirs of the Last Ten Years of the Reign of King George II
    • Colonists and Native People
      • from Mary Rowlandson, A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
        from William Penn, “A Letter from William Penn, Proprietary and Governor of Pennsylvania in America, to the Committee of the Free Society of Traders of that Province Residing in London” (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
        from Samson Occom, A Short Narrative of My Life (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
        Benjamin Franklin, “Remarks Concerning the Savages of North America” (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
        William Wordsworth, “Complaint of a Forsaken Indian Woman”
        from Susannah Johnson, The Captive American, or A Narrative of the Suffering of Mrs. Johnson During Four Years Captivity with the Indians and French

        • from the Introduction
          from Chapter 1
          from Chapter 3
          from Chapter 4
          from Chapter 5
    • American Independence
      • from Edmund Burke, “Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies”
        from Samuel Johnson, Taxation No Tyranny; an Answer to the Resolutions and Addresses of the American Congress (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
        from Benjamin Franklin, The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
        from Richard Price, Observations on the Nature of Civil Liberty, the Principles of Government, and the Justice and Policy of the War with America

        • from Part 2
          • from Section 1, Of the Justice of the War with America
            from Section 3, Of the Policy of the War with America
      • Thomas Jefferson, “A Declaration by the Representatives of the United States of America, in General Congress Assembled”
        from Thomas Paine, The American Crisis

        • Number 1
      • from Richard Price, Observations on the Importance of the American Revolution
        from Judith Sargent Murray, “The Gleaner Contemplates the Future Prospects of Women in this ‘Enlightened Age’” (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
  • OLAUDAH EQUIANO OR GUSTAVUS VASSA
    • from The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano
    • IN CONTEXT: Reactions to Olaudah Equiano’s Work
      • from The Analytic Review, May 1789
        from The Gentleman’s Magazine, June 1789
        from The Monthly Review, June 1789
        from The General Magazine and Impartial Review, July 1789

THE AGE OF ROMANTICISM

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE AGE OF ROMANTICISM
    • Political Parties and Royal Allegiances
      Imperial Expansion
      The Romantic Mind and Its Literary Productions
      The Business of Literature
      “Romantic”
      A Changing Language
  • HISTORY OF THE LANGUAGE AND OF PRINT CULTURE
  • CHARLOTTE SMITH
    • from Elegiac Sonnets
      • 1 (“The partial Muse, has from my earliest hours”)
        2 Written at the Close of Spring
        11 To Sleep
        39 To Night
        44 Written in the Church-yard at Middleton in Sussex
        59 Written September 1791
        70 On being cautioned against walking on an headland overlooking the sea
        74 The Winter Night
        84 To the Muse
  • CONTEXTS: THE FRENCH REVOLUTION
    • from Richard Price, A Discourse on the Love of Our Country
      from Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France
      from Thomas Paine, Rights of Man
      Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Letter to Charles Heath (29 August 1794)
      Samuel Taylor Coleridge, “Pantisocracy”
  • WILLIAM BLAKE
    • from Songs of Innocence and of Experience
      • from Songs of Innocence
        • Introduction
          The Ecchoing Green
          The Lamb
          The Little Black Boy
          The Chimney Sweeper
          The Divine Image
          Holy Thursday
          Infant Joy
          Nurse’s Song
    • IN CONTEXT: Charles Lamb, The Praise of Chimney-Sweepers
      • from Songs of Experience
        • Introduction
          The Clod & the Pebble
          Holy Thursday
          The Chimney Sweeper
          The Sick Rose
          The Fly
          The Tyger
          Ah! Sun-Flower
          The Garden of Love
          London
          The Human Abstract
          Infant Sorrow
          A Poison Tree
    • The Marriage of Heaven and Hell
      A Song of Liberty
      America (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
      IN CONTEXT: A Most Extraordinary Man (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

      • from Charles Lamb, Letter to Bernard Barton (15 May 1824)
        from John Thomas Smith, Nollekens and His Times
  • MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT
    • from A Vindication of the Rights of Woman
      • Introduction
        Chapter 2: The Prevailing Opinion of a Sexual Character Discussed
        from Chapter 3: The Same Subject Continued
    • IN CONTEXT: Contemporary Reviews of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman
      • from The Analytical Review 12 (1792)
        from The Critical Review 4 (1792)
    • from Maria; or The Wrongs of Woman (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
      • Chapter 5
  • WILLIAM WORDSWORTH
    • from Lyrical Ballads, 1798
      • Advertisement
        We Are Seven
        Lines Written in Early Spring
        The Thorn
        Expostulation and Reply
        The Tables Turned
        Complaint of a Forsaken Indian Woman
        Lines Written a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey
    • from Lyrical Ballads, 1800, 1802
      • Preface
        [There was a Boy]
        [Strange fits of passion I have known]
        Song [She dwelt among th’untrodden ways]
        [A slumber did my spirit seal]
        Lucy Gray
        Nutting
        Michael, A Pastoral Poem
        [I griev’d for Buonaparté]
    • Ode to Duty (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
      Resolution and Independence (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
      Composed upon Westminster Bridge, Sept. 3, 1803
      [The world is too much with us]
      [It is a beauteous Evening]
      London, 1802
      The Solitary Reaper
      [My heart leaps up]
      IN CONTEXT: “I wandered lonely as a Cloud”: Stages in the Life of a Poem

      • from Dorothy Wordsworth, Grasmere Journal (15 April 1802)
        [I wandered lonely as a Cloud] 1807
        [I wandered lonely as a Cloud] facsimile
        [I wandered lonely as a Cloud] transcription
        [I wandered lonely as a Cloud] 1815
    • Elegiac Stanzas
      Ode [Intimations of Immortality]
      from The Excursion (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

      • [The Ruined Cottage]
    • Surprised by Joy
      Mutability
      Steamboats, Viaducts, and Railways
      IN CONTEXT: Visual Depictions of “Man’s Art”
      The Prelude (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

      • The Two-Part Prelude of 1799
        • First Part
          Second Part
      • from The Fourteen-Book Prelude
        • from Book First: Introduction, Childhood, and School-Time
          from Book Fifth: Books
          from Book Sixth: Cambridge, and the Alps
          from Book Thirteenth: Subject Concluded
          from Book Fourteenth: Conclusion
  • CONTEXTS: READING, WRITING, PUBLISHING (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • from Daniel Isaac Eaton, The Pernicious Effects of the Art of Printing upon Society, Exposed
      Thomas Spence, “Examples of Safe Printing,” from Pig’s Meat, Volume 2
      Joshua, “Sonnet: The Lion,” from Moral and Political Magazine, Volume 1
      from Anonymous, “On the Characteristics of Poetry,” No. 2, from the Monthly Magazine
      from Anonymous, Letter to the Monthly Magazine (24 October 1798)
      from Samuel Pratt, Gleanings in England: Descriptive of the Countenance, Mind, and Character of the Country
      from Hannah More, Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education

      • from Chapter 8: “On Female Study”
    • from John Stuart Mill, “The Present State of Literature”
      Copyright and the Growth of “a Reading Age”

      • from Copyright Act of 1709 (the Statute of Anne)
        from Millar v. Taylor (1769)
        from Hinton v. Donaldson (Scotland, 1773); Donaldson v. Beckett (England, 1774)
        from Catharine Macaulay, A Modest Plea for the Property of Copyright
        from Robert Southey, “Inquiries Concerning the Proposed Alteration of the Laws of Copyright, as It Affects Authors and the Universities,” Quarterly Review (January 1819)
        from Thomas Babington Macaulay, Speech to House of Commons (5 February 1841)
  • MARY PRINCE
    • The History of Mary Prince, A West Indian Slave, Related by Herself
      IN CONTEXT: Mary Prince and Slavery

      • Report of the Presentation of Mary Prince’s Petition Presented to Parliament
        from Thomas Pringle, Supplement to The History of Mary Prince
  • CONTEXTS: SLAVERY AND ITS ABOLITION
    • from John Woolman, “Considerations on the Keeping of Negroes”
      from John Newton, A Slave Trader’s Journal
      from Quobna Ottobah Cugoano, Thoughts and Sentiments
      Hannah More, “Slavery: A Poem”
      Ann Yearsley, “A Poem on the Inhumanity of the Slave-Trade”
      from William Wilberforce, “Speech to the House of Commons,” 13 May 1789
      Proponents of Slavery

      • from Rev. Robert Boncher Nicholls, Observations
        from Anonymous, Thoughts on the Slavery of Negroes
    • from Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Men
      William Blake, Images of Slavery
      from Samuel Taylor Coleridge, On the Slave Trade
      Mary Robinson, Poems on Slavery

      • “The African”
        “The Negro Girl”
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY
    • To Wordsworth
      Alastor; or, The Spirit of Solitude
      Mutability
      Mont Blanc. Lines Written in the Vale of Chamouni
      Hymn to Intellectual Beauty
      Ozymandias
      Ode to the West Wind
      The Cloud
      To a Skylark
      Adonais: An Elegy on the Death of John Keats
      Mutability (“The flower that smiles to-day”)
      Stanzas, Written in Dejection—December 1818, near Naples
      Song to the Men of England
      England in 1819
      from A Defence of Poetry
  • JOHN KEATS
    • On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer
      On the Grasshopper and Cricket
      Sleep and Poetry
      On Seeing the Elgin Marbles
      On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again
      When I Have Fears that I May Cease to Be
      Epistle to John Hamilton Reynolds
      To Homer
      The Eve of St. Agnes
      Bright Star
      La Belle Dame sans Merci
      La Belle Dame sans Mercy
      Incipit altera Sonneta
      Ode to Psyche
      Ode to a Nightingale
      Ode on a Grecian Urn
      Ode on Melancholy
      Ode on Indolence (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
      To Autumn
      This Living Hand (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
      Selected Letters (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

      • To Benjamin Bailey (22 November 1817)
        To George and Thomas Keats (December 1817)
        To John Hamilton Reynolds (3 February 1818)
        To John Taylor (27 February 1818)
        To Benjamin Bailey (13 March 1818)
        To Benjamin Bailey (18 July 1818)
        To Richard Woodhouse (27 October 1818)
        To George and Georgiana Keats (14 February–3 May 1819)
        To Fanny Brawne (25 July 1819)
        To Percy Bysshe Shelley (16 August 1820)
        To Charles Brown (30 November 1820)
    • IN CONTEXT: Politics, Poetry, and the “Cockney School Debate” (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
      • from Leigh Hunt, “Young Poets,” Examiner (1 December 1816)
        from John Lockhart (“Z.”), “On the Cockney School of Poetry, No. 1,” Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine (October 1817)
        from John Lockhart (“Z.”), “On the Cockney School of Poetry, No. 4,” Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine (August 1818)
  • JOHN WILLIAM POLIDORI (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • The Vampyre: A Tale
  • MARY SHELLEY (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • from The Last Man
      • Chapter 29
        Chapter 30
    • IN CONTEXT: The “Last Man” Theme in the Nineteenth Century
      • Thomas Campbell, “The Last Man,” New Monthly Magazine (1823)
        from Thomas Campbell’s letter to the editor of The Edinburgh Review, 28 February 1825

THE VICTORIAN ERA

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE VICTORIAN ERA
    • A Growing Power
      Grinding Mills, Grinding Poverty
      Corn Laws, Potato Famine
      “The Two Nations”
      The Politics of Gender
      Empire
      Faith and Doubt
      Victorian Domesticity: Life and Death
      Cultural Trends
      Technology
      Cultural Identities
      Realism
      The Victorian Novel
      Poetry
      Drama
      Prose Non-Fiction and Print Culture
      The English Language in the Victorian Era
  • HISTORY OF THE LANGUAGE AND PRINT CULTURE
  • THOMAS CARLYLE
    • from Past and Present
      • from Book 1
        • Chapter 6—Hero-Worship
      • from Book 3
        • Chapter 2—Gospel of Mammonism
          Chapter 13—Democracy
  • ELIZABETH GASKELL
    • Our Society at Cranford
  • CONTEXTS: THE NEW ART OF PHOTOGRAPHY (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • Roger Fenton, “Proposal for the Formation of a Photographic Society”
      from Charles Dickens, “Photography,” Household Words, Vol. 7 (1853)
      Photography and Immortality

      • from Elizabeth Barrett, Letter to Mary Russell Mitford
        from Sir Frederick Pollock, “Presidential Address,” Photographic Society
    • Selected Photographs
  • DANTE GABRIEL ROSSETTI (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • The Blessed Damozel
      The Woodspurge
      Jenny
      My Sister’s Sleep
      Sibylla Palmifera
      Lady Lilith
      Mary Magdalene at the Door of Simon the Pharisee
      from The House of Life

      • The Sonnet
        6a: Nuptial Sleep
        10: The Portrait
        97: A Superscription
        101: The One Hope
  • LEWIS CARROLL (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • Verses Recited by Humpty Dumpty
      Jabberwocky
      IN CONTEXT: “Jabberwocky”

      • from Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There
        • from Chapter 1: Looking-Glass House
          from Chapter 6: Humpty Dumpty
  • ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON
    • The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
  • SIR ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE
    • The Adventure of the Speckled Band
  • RUDYARD KIPLING
    • Gunga Din
      Recessional
      The White Man’s Burden
      If—
      IN CONTEXT: Victoria and Albert
      IN CONTEXT: The “White Man’s Burden” in the Philippines

      • Platform of the American Anti-Imperialist League

THE TWENTIETH CENTURY AND BEYOND

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY: FROM 1900 TO MID-CENTURY
    • The Edwardian Period
      The World Wars
      Marx, Einstein, Freud, and Modernism
      The Place of Women
      Avant-Garde and Mass Culture
      Sexual Orientation
      Ireland
      Ideology and Economics in the 1930s and 1940s
      The Literature of the 1930s and 1940s
      Literature and Empire
      The English Language in the Early Twentieth Century
  • HISTORY OF THE LANGUAGE AND OF PRINT CULTURE
  • A.E. HOUSMAN
    • Loveliest of Trees
      To an Athlete Dying Young
      Terence, This Is Stupid Stuff
      Epitaph on an Army of Mercenaries
  • CONTEXTS: WAR AND REVOLUTION (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)
    • from Anonymous, “Introduction” to Songs and Sonnets for England in War Time
      “In Flanders Fields”: The Poem and Some Responses

      • John McCrae, “In Flanders Fields”
        John Mitchell, “Reply to ‘In Flanders Fields’”
        J.A. Armstrong, “Another Reply to ‘In Flanders Fields’”
        Elizabeth Daryush, “Flanders Fields”
    • Anonymous, “I Learned to Wash in Shell-Holes”
      J.P. Long and Maurice Scott, “Oh! It’s a Lovely War”
      from Rebecca West, “The Cordite Makers”
      from Francis Marion Beynon, Aleta Day

      • from Chapter 24: War
    • Ivor Gurney, “To His Love”
      Vance Palmer, “The Farmer Remembers the Somme”
      from Robert Graves, Good-Bye to All That

      • from Chapter 17
    • from May Wedderburn Cannan, Grey Ghosts and Voices
      from “Proceedings” of the All-Russian Central Executive Committee of Soviets of Workers’, Soldiers’, and Peasants’ Deputies
  • VIRGINIA WOOLF
    • The Mark on the Wall
      Kew Gardens
      Professions for Women
      IN CONTEXT: Woolf and Bloomsbury
  • KATHERINE MANSFIELD
    • The Garden Party
  • T.S. ELIOT
    • The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock
      The Waste Land
      Journey of the Magi
      Tradition and the Individual Talent
  • W.H. AUDEN
    • [Funeral Blues]
      [As I walked out one evening]
      Musée des Beaux Arts
      In Memory of W.B. Yeats
      September 1, 1939
  • INTRODUCTION TO THE LATE TWENTIETH AND EARLY TWENTY-FIRST CENTURIES: FROM 1945 ONWARD
    • The End of the War and the Coming of the Welfare State
      The End of Empire
      From the 1960s to Century’s End
      Ireland, Scotland, Wales
      The New Millennium
      The History of the English Language
  • DYLAN THOMAS
    • The Force That Through the Green Fuse Drives the Flower
      Fern Hill
      Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night
      A Refusal to Mourn the Death, by Fire, of a Child in London
  • PHILIP LARKIN
    • Days
      Church Going
      Talking in Bed
      Dockery and Son
      Annus Mirabilis
      High Windows
      This Be the Verse
      Vers de Société
      The Old Fools
      Aubade
  • CHINUA ACHEBE
    • Dead Men’s Path
  • SEAMUS HEANEY
    • Digging
      Thatcher
      The Wife’s Tale
      The Grauballe Man
      Punishment
      Casualty
      Seeing Things
      [The door was open and the house was dark]
  • NGŨGĨ WA THIONG’O
    • from Decolonising the Mind
      • Chapter 3
        Chapter 4
        Chapter 5
  • MARGARET ATWOOD
    • Death of a Young Son by Drowning
      The Immigrants
      [you fit into me]
      The Door
  • JOHN CLEESE AND GRAHAM CHAPMAN
    • from Monty Python’s Flying Circus
      • Dead Parrot Sketch
        Pet Conversion
        Dirty Hungarian Phrasebook
        Spam
  • EAVAN BOLAND
    • Night Feed
      The Lost Land
      Against Love Poetry
  • SALMAN RUSHDIE
    • The Prophet’s Hair
  • KAZUO ISHIGURO
    • A Village After Dark
  • CAROL ANN DUFFY
    • Stealing
      Adultery
      The Good Teachers
      Drunk
      Mean Time
      Mrs. Lazarus
      Wish
      Water
  • ZADIE SMITH
    • The Waiter’s Wife
      Joy

APPENDICES

Reading Poetry

Maps

Monarchs and Prime Ministers of Great Britain

Glossary of Terms

British Money (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

Texts and Contexts: Chronological Chart (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

Bibliography (sites.broadviewpress.com/bablonline)

Permissions Acknowledgments

Index of First Lines

Index of Authors and Titles

Our Editorial Team:

Joseph Black, University of Massachusetts
Leonard Conolly, Trent University
Kate Flint, University of Southern California
Isobel Grundy, University of Alberta
Roy Liuzza, University of Tennessee
Jerome McGann, University of Virginia
Anne Prescott, Barnard College
Barry Qualls, Rutgers University
Claire Waters, University of California, Davis

The Broadview Anthology of British Literature companion sites include content for both instructors and students.

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