The Winter’s Tale
A Broadview Internet Shakespeare Edition
  • Publication Date: December 4, 2014
  • ISBN: 9781554810901 / 1554810906
  • 296 pages; 5½" x 8½"

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Availability: Worldwide

The Winter’s Tale

A Broadview Internet Shakespeare Edition

  • Publication Date: December 4, 2014
  • ISBN: 9781554810901 / 1554810906
  • 296 pages; 5½" x 8½"

Neither comedy nor tragedy, The Winter’s Tale contains elements of each genre, and defies easy classification. It experiments, like many of Shakespeare’s late plays, with different styles and tones, and draws on a wide range of sources and inspirations. Full of mysteries and miracles, grief and dark humour, this strange play has fascinated critics and theatregoers for centuries.

Theatrical and cinematic productions have tried to capture the range of interpretations and staging possibilities presented by The Winter’s Tale, and the introduction to this edition explores the play’s long histories in performance and in criticism. Illustrations and extended notes interleaved throughout the text discuss the echoes of religious, scientific, and mythological texts found in the play.

Comments

“This superb new edition of Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale is another excellent entry in the relatively new Broadview/Internet Shakespeare Editions series. Its virtues are many: a beautifully organized introduction; very fine glosses with extremely useful enlarged notes and illustrations; excellent sources; very useful analogues; and a superb bibliography. Hardin Aasand’s is now, for me, the teaching edition; I can’t wait to own it and teach from it.” — Peter Platt, Barnard College

FOREWARD
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
INTRODUCTION
SHAKESPEARE’S LIFE
SHAKESPEARE’S THEATER
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE: A BRIEF CHRONOLOGY
A NOTE ON THE TEXT
ABBREVIATIONS

THE WINTER’S TALE

APPENDIX A: SOURCES

  1. Robert Greene, Pandosto (1588)
  2. From Ovid, Metamorphoses
    1. Pygmalion
    2. Ceres and Proserpina
    3. Callisto

APPENDIX B: ANALOGS

  1. From James VI of Scotland, Basilikon Doron (1599)
  2. From Robert Greene, The Second and Last Part of Coney-Catching and the Third and Last Part of Coney-Catching (1592)
  3. From God’s Handi-Work in Wonders (1615)

WORKS CITED AND BIBLIOGRAPHY

Hardin L. Aasand is Professor of English at Indiana University — Purdue University Fort Wayne.

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