The Broadview Anthology of Social and Political Thought – Volume 2: The Twentieth Century and Beyond
  • Publication Date: September 12, 2008
  • ISBN: 9781551118994 / 1551118998
  • 590 pages; 7¾" x 9¼"
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The Broadview Anthology of Social and Political Thought – Volume 2: The Twentieth Century and Beyond

  • Publication Date: September 12, 2008
  • ISBN: 9781551118994 / 1551118998
  • 590 pages; 7¾" x 9¼"

The second volume of this comprehensive anthology covers the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. The anthology is broad ranging both in its selection of material by figures traditionally acknowledged as being of central importance, and in the material it presents by a range of other figures. The material in this volume is presented in three sections. The first, “Power and the State,” includes selections by such figures as Goldman, Lenin, Weber, Schmitt, and Hayek. Among those included in the “Race, Gender, and Colonialism” section are de Beauvoir, Gandhi, Fanon, and Young. The third and by far the longest section, “Rights-Based Liberalism and its Critics,” focuses on the many interrelated directions that social and political philosophy has taken since the publication of John Rawls’s ground-breaking A Theory of Justice in 1971.

In order to better meet the needs of today’s students, the editors have made every effort to include accurate and accessible translations of the readings. Additionally, every selection has been painstakingly annotated, and each figure is given a substantial introduction highlighting her or his major contributions within the tradition. For figures of central importance, the editors have included extended introductions that place the figure in the context of intellectual history as well as of political thought. In order to ensure the highest standards of accuracy and accessibility, the editors have consulted dozens of leading academics during the course of the volume’s development (many of whom have contributed introductory material as well as advice). The result is an anthology with unparalleled pedagogical benefits; The Broadview Anthology of Social and Political Thought sets the new standard for social and political philosophy instruction.

The Broadview Anthology of Social and Political Thought is also available as a single volume of Essential Readings, covering the full historical span of Western social and political thought from ancient Greece to the 21st Century.

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Also available:

The Broadview Anthology of Social and Political Thought: Volume 1: From Plato to Nietzsche

The Broadview Anthology of Social and Political Thought: From Machiavelli to Nietzsche

Comments

“This is a wonderful collection, with great introductory essays: it is the ideal point of entry to social and political theory over the last century. We should all be grateful to the editors for selecting and contextualizing so rich a body of materials.” — Kwame Anthony Appiah, Princeton University

“This excellent collection of essays situates the questions of the oppressed and colonized against and within traditional mainstream political thought. Bringing the diverse contributions of feminism and other liberation struggles to the forefront, it offers a new approach to the teaching and study of social and political theory. Carefully edited readings are augmented with accessible introductions that trace the historical developments of political ideologies. Spanning traditions and ideological divides, The Broadview Anthology of Social and Political Thought is wonderfully adaptable to a variety of courses in political theory or history of political thought at virtually every level of higher education.” — Sally J. Scholz, Villanova University

“This anthology offers an invaluable, wide-ranging, and inclusive overview of recent political thought organized around central questions and themes in political theory throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. A detailed introduction to each section and each author provides a rich historical background to theories and theorists. Courses that utilize this volume will have abundant resources from which to familiarize students with the complexity and diversity of political thought from the past hundred plus years.” — Colleen Murphy, Texas A&M University

“This authoritative, comprehensive and highly accessible anthology manages to bring together key texts of some of the most important political theorists of our age. The selections have not only been chosen with a keen eye for excellence, but are preceded by very helpful introductory essays. It should prove an invaluable guide for students and scholars alike.” — R.B.J. Tinnevelt, Radboud University Nijmegen

“An outstanding collection of readings drawn from classical and contemporary political thought. The immensely helpful introductions to each of the three central parts will greatly assist students in understanding the context and significance of each figure’s work.” — Gillian Brock, University of Auckland

“This volume is a very bold collaborative effort which deserves rich praise for its meticulous attempt to encompass such a broad swathe of mainly twentieth-century political thought readings in a manageable compass. … [The anthology’s] aim to move beyond the more standard ideas of post-1970s rights-based philosophical liberalism into a wide range of readings concerned with power, the state, gender, race, and so forth, is also to be fulsomely welcomed. The volume provides a much more detailed and historically accurate picture of political thought in this period than one encounters in many other synoptic volumes. Overall the editors are to be congratulated for having put together this volume in such a scholarly and thoughtful manner, and for having provided full and helpful introductions for a student readership. It should be of great utility for courses in political thought.” — Andrew Vincent, Sheffield University

Preface
Acknowledgements

PART I Power and the State

INTRODUCTION

  • Victoria Kamsler

EMMA GOLDMAN

  • from “Anarchism: What It Really Stands For” (1910)

V.I. LENIN

  • from What is to be Done? (1902)

LEON TROTSKY

  • “Their Morals and Ours: The Class Foundations of Moral Practice” (1938)

JOHN DEWEY

  • “Means and Ends: Their Interdependence, and Leon Trotsky’s Essay on ‘Their Morals and Ours’” (1938)

MAX WEBER

  • from “Politics as a Vocation” (1919)

CARL SCHMITT

  • from The Concept of the Political (1932)

F.A. HAYEK

  • from The Constitution of Liberty (1960)
    • Chapter 10, “Law, Commands, and Order”

GIOVANNI GENTILE

  • from Origins and Doctrine of Fascism (1929)

HANNAH ARENDT

  • from The Human Condition (1958)
    • Chapter 28, “Power and the Space of Appearance”
  • “On the Nature of Totalitarianism: An Essay in Understanding” (1954)

MICHEL FOUCAULT

  • from Discipline and Punish (1975)
  • “Two Lectures” (1976)

PART II Race, Gender, and Colonialism

INTRODUCTION

  • Victoria Kamsler

W.E.B. DU BOIS

  • from The Souls of Black Folk (1903)
    • Chapter 1, “Of Our Spiritual Strivings”

SIMONE DE BEAUVOIR

  • from The Second Sex (1949)

MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.

  • “Letter from Birmingham Jail” (April 16, 1963)

MAHATMA GANDHI

  • “Satyagraha: Not Passive Resistance” [2 September 1917]
  • “The Doctrine of the Sword” [11 August 1920]
  • “Problems of Non-violence” [9 August 1925]

FRANTZ FANON

  • from The Wretched of the Earth (1961)

IRIS YOUNG

  • “Impartiality and the Civic Public: Some Implications of Feminist Critiques of Moral and
    Political Theory” (1986)
  • from Justice and the Politics of Difference (1990)
    • Chapter 1, “Displacing the Distributive Paradigm”

CATHERINE MACKINNON

  • “Abortion: On Public and Private” (1989)
  • “Toward a New Theory of Equality” (2005)

PART III Rights-Based Liberalism and its Critics

INTRODUCTION

  • Alex Sager and Will Kymlicka

JOHN RAWLS

  • from A Theory of Justice (Revised Edition [1999])
    • The Main Idea of the Theory of Justice
      The Original Position and Justification
      Classical Utilitarianism
      Two Principles of Justice
      Democratic Equality and the Difference Principle
      Fair Equality of Opportunity and Pure Procedural Justice
      Primary Social Goods as the Basis of Expectations
      The Tendency to Equality
      The Veil of Ignorance
  • “The Idea of an Overlapping Consensus” (1987)

ROBERT NOZICK

  • from Anarchy, State, and Utopia (1974)
    • from Chapter 7, “Distributive Justice”

G.A. COHEN

  • “Robert Nozick and Wilt Chamberlain: How Patterns Preserve Liberty” (1977)

ISAIAH BERLIN

  • “Two Concepts of Liberty” (1958)

CHARLES TAYLOR

  • “What’s Wrong with Negative Liberty?” (1979)

MICHAEL J. SANDEL

  • “The Procedural Republic and the Unencumbered Self” (1984)

MICHAEL WALZER

  • from Spheres of Justice (1983)
    • Chapter 1, “Complex Equality”

WILL KYMLICKA

  • from Multicultural Citizenship (1995)
    • Chapter 6, “Justice and Minority Rights”

JÜRGEN HABERMAS

  • A summary of the 1962 work The Structured Transformation of the Public Sphere,
    “The Public Sphere” (1973)
  • from The Inclusion of the Other: Studies in Political Theory, “Three Normative Models
    of Democracy” (1996)

AMARTYA SEN

  • from Development as Freedom (1999)
    • Chapter 1, “The Perspective of Freedom”

MARTHA NUSSBAUM

  • “Human Capabilities, Female Human Beings” (1995)
  • “Beyond ‘Compassion and Humanity’: Justice for Non-Human Animals” (2004)
    • Martha Nussbaum and Cass Sunstein

SUSAN MOLLER OKIN

  • from Justice, Gender, and the Family (1989)
    • Chapter 5, “Justice as Fairness: For Whom?”
    • Chapter 8, “Conclusion: Toward a Humanist Justice”

THOMAS POGGE

  • “Cosmopolitanism and Sovereignty” (1992)

HARRY BRIGHOUSE AND ADAM SWIFT

  • “Parents’ Rights and the Value of the Family” (2006)

Sources/Permission Acknowledgments
Index of Authors and Titles

General Editors:
Andrew Bailey, University of Guelph
Samantha Brennan, University of Western Ontario
Will Kymlicka, Queen’s University
Jacob Levy, McGill University
Alex Sager, Portland State University
Clark Wolf, Iowa State University

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