Contemporary Perspectives on Early Modern Philosophy
Essays in Honor of Vere Chappell
9781551116624.jpg
  • Publication Date: February 19, 2008
  • ISBN: 9781551116624 / 1551116626
  • 366 pages; 6" x 9"
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Contemporary Perspectives on Early Modern Philosophy

Essays in Honor of Vere Chappell

  • Publication Date: February 19, 2008
  • ISBN: 9781551116624 / 1551116626
  • 366 pages; 6" x 9"

Contemporary Perspectives on Early Modern Philosophy is a collection of essays dedicated to Vere Chappell, one of the most respected scholars in the field of early modern philosophy. Seventeen distinguished scholars have contributed essays to this collection on topics including dualism, identity and essence, causation, theodicy, free will, perception, abstraction, and the moral law.

Comments

“Original, incisive, probing essays on central topics in the history of modern philosophy by leaders in the field in honor of one of the masters in the discipline.” — R.C. Sleigh, Jr., University of Massachusetts, Amherst

“This volume of eighteen well-crafted analytical essays on Descartes, Locke, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant is authored and edited by some of the best known historians of philosophy today. Ranging over issues in the philosophy of mind, metaphysics, moral philosophy, and the philosophy of science, it is a fitting tribute to a notable scholar.” — Catherine Wilson, City University of New York Graduate Center

Introduction

  1. Gary Matthews
    • Descartes’s Fourth Meditation as Theodicy
  2. Lisa Shapiro
    • “Turn My Will in Completely the Opposite Direction”: Radical Doubt and Descartes’s Account of Free
      Will
  3. Marleen Rozemond
    • Descartes’s Ontology of the Eternal Truths
  4. Thomas M. Lennon
    • The Significance of Descartes’s Objection of Objections
  5. Alison Simmons
    • Guarding the Body: A Cartesian Phenomenology of Perception
  6. John Carriero
    • Substance and Ends in Leibniz
  7. G.A.J. Rogers
    • Locke and the Creation of the Essay
  8. Nicholas Jolley
    • Lockean Abstractionism Versus Cartesian Nativism
  9. Edwin McCann
    • Identity, Essentialism, and the Substance of Body in Locke
  10. Dan Kaufman
    • The Resurrection of the Same Body and the Ontological Status of Organisms: What Locke Should Have (and Could Have)
      Told Stillingfleet
  11. Michael Jacovides
    • Lockean Fluids
  12. Kenneth P. Winkler
    • Locke’s Defense of Mathematical Physics
  13. Martha Brandt Bolton
    • Intellectual Virtue and Moral Law in Locke’s Ethics
  14. Margaret Atherton
    • What Have We Learned When We Learn to See?: Lessons Learned from the Theory of Vision Vindicated
  15. Janet Broughton
    • Hume’s Explanation of Causal Inference
  16. Stephen Voss
    • A Critique of Kantian Sensibility
  17. Paul Guyer
    • Object, Self, and Cause: Kant’s Answers to Hume

Index

Paul Hoffman is Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Riverside. He has published widely in early modern philosophy in many of the top journals, including Journal of Philosophy and Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.

David Owen is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Arizona, Tucson. He is the author of Hume’s Reason (Oxford University Press, 1999).

Gideon Yaffe is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. He is the author of Manifest Activity: Thomas Reid’s Theory of Action (Oxford, 2004) and Liberty Worth the Name: Locke on Free Agency (Princeton University Press, 2000).