New Publications

Hanging Together from Introducing Philosophy

The following excerpt is from our forthcoming Introducing Philosophy: Knowledge and Reality, which is written by Jack S. Crumley II. When a belief of ours fits with, or “hangs with,” other beliefs, we are no doubt inclined to give greater epistemic weight or credibility to that belief. It is not very difficult to see why.…

Ezra Pound on Dubliners

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Our edition of Dubliners, edited by Keri Walsh, is now available! We’d like to share an excerpt from Appendix A of our new edition. For more information on the text, click here. From Ezra Pound, “Dubliners and Mr. James Joyce,” The Egoist (15 July 1914) Freedom from sloppiness is so rare in contemporary English prose…

Lenore Keeshig [Tobias], “Stop Stealing Native Stories”

The following is an excerpt from our recently published Introduction to Indigenous Literary Criticism in Canada, edited by Heather Macfarlane and Armand Garnet Ruffo. Lenore Keeshig [Tobias], Anishinaabekwe, was born on Neyaashiinigmiing (the Cape Croker Reserve) on the Saugeen Peninsula in Ontario. An Ojibway journalist, storyteller, poet, children’s author and activist, she is a founding…

Tekahionwake on Indigenous Representation in 19th C Fiction

Here is an excerpt from our appendices of the recently published Tekahionwake: E. Pauline Johnson’s Writings on Native North America. A Strong Race Opinion: On the Indian Girl In Modern Fiction [In this essay, Johnson attacks dominant stereotype of the “Indian maiden” and argues that writers should try to find out about real Indigenous people, rather…

The Paradox of the Heap, from John L. Bell’s Oppositions and Paradoxes

In Oppositions and Paradoxes John L. Bell explores a variety of mathematical and scientific paradoxes with philosophical precision, while retaining a great sense of humour in his investigations. In this excerpt, Bell formulates and works through “The Problem of the Heap,” asking: how many grains of sand does one need to make a heap, exactly?…

New to the Broadview Anthology of British Literature: Thomas Dekker’s Plague Pamphlets

Broadview recently released a third edition of The Broadview Anthology of British Literature Volume 2: The Renaissance and the Early Seventeenth Century. As with all new editions of our anthology, the third edition of Volume 2 features exciting new material. In this entry of the Broadview Blog, we present a sample of this material: two…

The Broadview Sources series in history launches with The Trial of Charles I

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We are very pleased to announce the launch of the Broadview Sources series with the March 2016 publication of K.J. Kesselring’s The Trial of Charles I. Each volume in this new series features a short overview of a historical topic, together with a collection of documents. Geared towards the undergraduate classroom, these texts allow students…

Our popular edition of Frankenstein just got better! Welcome to Broadview’s Online Critical Editions

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Hello everyone, This fall at Broadview we are trying something new and exciting with three of our best-loved Broadview Editions—Frankenstein, Heart of Darkness, and The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: we are publishing extensive websites focused on critical approaches to each text. These Online Critical Editions will include a dozen or more…

Can you get 10/10 on our Business Ethics quiz?

Andrew Kernohan’s forthcoming book, Business Ethics: An Interactive Introduction, not only explains various business-relevant applications of ethical theory, it also invites readers to practice those applications through interactive digital exercises. The text includes over 400 such exercises, along with videos, flash cards, and other digital materials (all included with no registration or additional cost beyond…

The Helpful Suggestions of Academic Writing Now

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Broadview’s latest book on English composition, Academic Writing Now: A Brief Guide for Busy Students by David Starkey, invites the student reader to write throughout—and all over—its pages. Many students write in their books as a method of memorization: textbooks are a haven for highlighters; grammar guides have lines for filling out exercises; a favorite novel is dog-eared and marked up in pencil.…

Biggest Book of the Year – The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: One-Volume Compact Edition

Hello everyone, In the publishing world it’s common for people to speak of the “big books” for the season. They don’t usually mean 2,178 pages in length, 1.85 inches in thickness, and 4.38 lbs. in weight. That’s what the new one-volume Compact edition of The Broadview Anthology of British Literature comes in at—and we’re not…

The “Umbrella-Philosopher” According to R.L. Stevenson

From Robert Louis Stevenson, “The Philosophy of Umbrellas” (210). Appendix L “The Victorian Gentleman: Body and Clothing” of the Broadview Edition.  More information on our new edition of Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde – Third Edition can be found here. Any one acquainted with the growth of Society, and knowing out of what small seeds…

Philosophizing About Sex: Teenage Sexting

In Broadview’s acclaimed new publication, Philosophizing about Sex, Laurie J. Shrage & Robert Scott Stewart discuss general issues (freedom, privacy, objectification, etc.) and show how ongoing public discussions of sexuality can be illuminated by careful philosophical investigation. In the following excerpt, they look at the complex topic of teenage “sexting.” Some recent studies suggest that teens…

Costume Design for Salome: Everyone in Yellow

Excerpt from Graham Robertson’s Time Was (125-6) (from the Appendices of the new Broadview Edition) [Graham Robertson designed the costumes for the original production of Salome at the request of Sarah Bernhardt. Both Robertson and Wilde expressed a desire that the wardrobe represent varying shades of yellow. According to Sheldon Weintraub, “yellow was not only…

Victims and Victimhood: Trudy Govier in Conversation

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Broadview Press is proud to have recently published Victims and Victimhood by Trudy Govier, a careful examination of the concept of victimhood. Issues are explored with reference to a range of complex examples, including child victims of institutional abuse and the famed Rigoberta Menchú controversy. Further topics include the authority of personal experience, restorative justice, restitution, forgiveness,…

Kirsten Lodge’s New Translation of Notes from the Underground

Kirsten Lodge’s new translation of Notes from the Underground has been receiving high commendation from academics and readers alike. The following review by Jefferson Gatrall at Montclair State University praises both Lodge’s translation and her contextual materials for students: Kirsten Lodge has performed an invaluable service for modern readers with her new translation of Dostoevsky’s Notes from the Underground. This classic…

The Dawn of Ebooks

In 1999, the development of the Open eBook (OeB) format—which would later become the EPUB format—was the first step in moving publishing into a digital age. Early e-readers such as the Rocket Ebook and the Softbook were issued, and publishers began implementing systems of digital production. In 2000, Stephen King became the first author to…

The Linotype and the Mechanization of Typesetting

The invention of the typewriter in the 1860s spurred a fervent interest in speed, legibility, and precision among writers and publishers alike. As individual writers experienced the various advantages of typescript over a handwritten manuscript, printing houses began looking for ways to replicate the efficiency of the keyboard in large-scale printing practices. An increasingly mechanical…

Encyclopédie and the Enlightenment

Denis Diderot and Jean le Rond d’Alembert’s Encyclopédie was a landmark publication of the 18th century, both in terms of its scope and its distribution. Although the encyclopedia had existed as a genre for centuries prior (one of the most notable contributions being Pliny the Elder’s Natural History in 77 CE), the scale of the Encyclopédie…

Type Design and the Development of Fonts

Garamond. Caslon. Baskerville. Bodoni. These names have survived as widely known font types, but their origins go back as early as the 16th century when the expansion of printing and readership called for the development and evolution of type design. Claude Garamond was the first to combine popular roman and italic fonts that were established…

Deciphering Early Script: The Rosetta Stone

We know it now as a popular program for learning languages like French, Spanish, or Italian, but the original Rosetta Stone was the key to unlocking the meaning of early hieroglyphic inscriptions. In 1799, after centuries of misinterpreting the Egyptian writing system, French soldiers came across a stone located in the Egyptian city of Rosetta;…

Does examining literature wreck literature?

In this excerpt from the introduction to our newly published anthology, The Broadview Introduction to Literature, general editor Neta Gordon addresses the age-old question: Does delving deeper into the structure, meaning, and purpose of a literary work only serve to destroy the value of that work?

Interview with H.E. Baber on Globalization

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In anticipation of the publication of Globalization and International Development, we spoke with co-editor (along with Denise Dimon) H.E. Baber to get her thoughts on the ethical and economic issues surrounding globalization and the ways in which this new anthology brings those issues to light.

On the Writing of Writing about Literature 2/e

“I wish our clever young poets would remember my homely definitions of prose and poetry; that is prose, words in their best order; poetry, the best words in the best order.” – Samuel Taylor Coleridge Writing about Literature 2/e was written because literature and writing instructors were asking for a chapter on poetry to complement…