Reflections on Philosophy and Math

Eric Steinhart, author of More Precisely: The Math You Need to Do Philosophy, shares his thoughts on the new edition of his book, and the practice of using math in philosophy. Philosophers are increasingly using mathematical tools to make their arguments and to construct their theories. Analytic philosophers have long used mathematics, but recently philosophers usually…

A Toast to a New Stamp Act Sourcebook

What better way to celebrate a victory than with a series of toasts. A group calling themselves the Sons of Liberty did just that on the occasion of the repeal of the Stamp Act. This document is included in Jonathan Mercantini’s newly published The Stamp Act of 1765, the second title to appear in the…

“avowedly a literary orgie:” A Contemporary Review of A Marriage Below Zero

The following is a review of A Marriage Below Zero published in Belford’s Magazine in June of 1889 upon the novel’s first publication. This review, among others, is featured in our new edition of A Marriage Below Zero, edited by Richard A. Kaye. In producing this book the writer, who wisely conceals his identity under an evident pseudonym, has touched…

The Socialist Circle of 1880’s London: Engels on A City Girl

The following is an excerpt from Appendix A of our recently published edition of Margaret Harkness’s A City Girl, in which Friedrich Engels responds to the novel. [The following letter from Friedrich Engels (1820–95) to Harkness about A City Girl has perhaps generated more concentrated attention from critics than the novel itself. Engels, the German-born philosopher…

On Editing Mary Shelley’s Mathilda

[Michelle Faubert, editor of our new edition of Mary Shelley’s Mathilda, shares her thoughts on editing the text.] Editing Mary Shelley’s Mathilda (1819; first published 1959) for Broadview Press has been hugely exciting for me, not least because I transcribed it from the manuscript. In 1959, Elizabeth Nitchie first transcribed Mathilda for publication from a…

Pedagogy and International Students

I thought I would write this week about the extraordinary growth over the past generation in the number of international students attending North American universities, the pedagogical challenges this growth has presented—and about one aspect of the latest edition of our Broadview Anthology of Expository Prose that represents a response to these challenges. Thirty years ago EAL*…

The Evolution of the Writing Handbook

Broadview’s most successful book thus far this year is the sixth edition of our Broadview Guide to Writing. It’s a success that I’m sure has come in large part as a result of They Say / I Say authors Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein’s comment on the latest edition: “Even the most useful reference guides…

Charlotte Smith’s “tender and exquisite effusions”

[To celebrate the recent publication of our new edition of Charlotte Smith: Major Poetic Works, we are sharing an excerpt from a review included in the appendices of the new edition. This glowing review was published in Gentlemen’s Magazine in April of 1786, in response to Smith’s Elegiac Sonnets.] It has been suggested by a…

The Legacy of Thoreau’s Civil Disobedience

As the streets of America fill with protesters on a nearly weekly basis since the inauguration of President Trump last month, the writings of Henry David Thoreau remain as relevant as ever. One of his most well-known works speaks to the importance of “cultivating personal integrity in the face of political injustice” according to Bob…

The Grass Cove Massacre from The Travels of Hildebrand Bowman

[The following is an excerpt from The Travels of Hildebrand Bowman, introduced by the editor of our new edition of the book, Lance Bertelsen. For more information on our newly published edition of Hildebrand Bowman, click here.] Inspired by an actual event on Captain Cook’s second voyage and often called “the first New Zealand novel,” The…

Horatio Alger and the Myth of Social Mobility

“Americans vastly overestimate the likelihood of moving up the economic ladder,” Jeff Guo posits in his January 18 article for the Washington Post in which he discusses the myths and reality of social mobility in America. Drawing from Gary Scharnhorst’s introduction to Broadview’s forthcoming edition of Horatio Alger’s social mobility novel, Ragged Dick, Guo draws…

On Truth, from For the Sake of Argument

[The following is an excerpt from Chapter 1 of our forthcoming For the Sake of Argument by Robert Martin. For more information on the book, please visit our website] Truth I said this book is about argument. But why argue about philosoph­ical beliefs? It’s a free country; everyone’s entitled to their own opinion, right? Well,…

From James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson (1791)

[The following is an excerpt from Appendix F in our recently published The Life of Mr Richard Savage, written by Samuel Johnson. You can see more information about our new edition, edited by Nicholas Seager and Lance Wilcox, on our website.] The young Scots law student James Boswell (1740-95) first met Johnson in 1763, and…

The Ethics of Consuming Animals and Animals Products

[We’d like to share some thoughts on the ethics of consuming animals and animal products in recognition of yesterday’s World Animal Day. Some of the editors of the recently published The Broadview Anthology of Expository Prose 3/e are vegan, while others consume animal products; all are agreed that the issue of how animals are treated in…

An Extended Stay at The Grand Babylon Hotel: My thoughts on editing Arnold Bennett’s fantasia

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Randi Saloman at the 2006 Arnold Bennett Society Conference at Staffordshire University, holding an Arnold Bennett figurine gifted by the Society, with then Lord Mayor of Stoke-on-Trent Jean Edwards in the background. [This summer we were excited to publish an edition of The Grand Babylon Hotel.  Our editor, Randi Saloman, wanted to share some thoughts on her…

Test your knowledge in Bioethics!

Our recently published Bioethics in Context covers a wide range of topics, including: appropriate measures one should take to obtain informed consent and to protect patient privacy, dealing with patients who exhibit signs of mental illness, responding to sensitive cultural and religious concerns, and balancing the needs of medical researchers with those of patients participating…

Instructional Treatise from A Book for Governesses

The Half-Caste The following is an excerpt from Appendix C of our recently published The Half-Caste by Dinah Mulock Craik, edited by Melissa Edmundson. [volume editor’s note] The social and financial status of the Victorian governess was a topic of debate throughout the nineteenth century…Emily Peart’s A Book for Governesses (1868) provides an example of the many…

Why Write? An Excerpt from Nancy Pagh’s Write Moves

Write Moves [Nancy Pagh’s new creative writing guide (with readings) is shaped around the idea that creative writing exists to move us. In the excerpt below, from the chapter “Why Write?”, Pagh discusses some of the impulses and experiences that lead creative writers to put words on the page.] Language That Is Our Own Creative…

Hanging Together from Introducing Philosophy

The following excerpt is from our forthcoming Introducing Philosophy: Knowledge and Reality, which is written by Jack S. Crumley II. When a belief of ours fits with, or “hangs with,” other beliefs, we are no doubt inclined to give greater epistemic weight or credibility to that belief. It is not very difficult to see why.…

Ezra Pound on Dubliners

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Our edition of Dubliners, edited by Keri Walsh, is now available! We’d like to share an excerpt from Appendix A of our new edition. For more information on the text, click here. From Ezra Pound, “Dubliners and Mr. James Joyce,” The Egoist (15 July 1914) Freedom from sloppiness is so rare in contemporary English prose…

Lenore Keeshig [Tobias], “Stop Stealing Native Stories”

The following is an excerpt from our recently published Introduction to Indigenous Literary Criticism in Canada, edited by Heather Macfarlane and Armand Garnet Ruffo. Lenore Keeshig [Tobias], Anishinaabekwe, was born on Neyaashiinigmiing (the Cape Croker Reserve) on the Saugeen Peninsula in Ontario. An Ojibway journalist, storyteller, poet, children’s author and activist, she is a founding…

Tekahionwake on Indigenous Representation in 19th C Fiction

Here is an excerpt from our appendices of the recently published Tekahionwake: E. Pauline Johnson’s Writings on Native North America. A Strong Race Opinion: On the Indian Girl In Modern Fiction [In this essay, Johnson attacks dominant stereotype of the “Indian maiden” and argues that writers should try to find out about real Indigenous people, rather…

The Paradox of the Heap, from John L. Bell’s Oppositions and Paradoxes

In Oppositions and Paradoxes John L. Bell explores a variety of mathematical and scientific paradoxes with philosophical precision, while retaining a great sense of humour in his investigations. In this excerpt, Bell formulates and works through “The Problem of the Heap,” asking: how many grains of sand does one need to make a heap, exactly?…

New to the Broadview Anthology of British Literature: Thomas Dekker’s Plague Pamphlets

Broadview recently released a third edition of The Broadview Anthology of British Literature Volume 2: The Renaissance and the Early Seventeenth Century. As with all new editions of our anthology, the third edition of Volume 2 features exciting new material. In this entry of the Broadview Blog, we present a sample of this material: two…