New Publications

Aimée Duc’s Are They Women?: Translation as an Act of Literary Recovery

[Margaret Sönser Breen and Nisha Kommattam share their thoughts on translating and editing the new Broadview edition of Are They Women? as an act of literary recovery.] The idea of translating Aimée Duc’s remarkable lesbian novel from 1901 began some four years ago. Margaret Sönser Breen was reading a study of fin-de-siècle German culture and…

Make a Track to the Water’s Edge: A Reflection on Racial Inequality at the Centennial of the 19th Amendment

[Anna Spydell, one of the editors of Dreams by Olive Schreiner, reflects on the place of Dreams in the history of women’s suffrage and the complex legacy of 20th-century suffrage.] When we set out to bring Olive Schreiner’s Dreams back into the public consciousness, we had this date, August 18, 2020, in our sights. The…

A Quantum of Solace: Lockdown, Luxury, and a New Perspective on Bond

[Jason Haslam and Julia M. Wright, editors of the new Broadview edition of Casino Royale, share their thoughts on the novel, luxury, and our current moment of lock down scarcity.] When we first agreed to write a blog on Casino Royale, COVID-19 was a serious virus spreading around the world but not yet a pandemic.…

“the triumph of hypocrisy over integrity”: Julius Bailey on America in 2020

[The following is an excerpt from the introduction to Julius Bailey’s new book, Racism, Hypocrisy, and Bad Faith: A Moral Challenge to the America I Love.] I am strongly in favor of common sense, common honesty and common decency. This makes me forever ineligible to any public office of trust or profit in the Republic.…

This Land is Their Land

Char Miller[1] However polite its title, the 1891 “Petition to the Senators and Representatives of the Congress of the United States in the Behalf of the Remnants of the former Tribes of the Yosemite Indians Praying for Aid and Assistance” was anything but deferential. It offers a blunt critique of white gold miners’ brutal incursion into…

Do Protests Work?: From an 1838 People’s Charter to Today’s Climate Marches

[Barbara Leckie and Janice Schroeder, editors of the new Broadview edition of London Labour and the London Poor, invite you to join in on the conversation about Mayhew in the 21st century. What does his work have to do with where we are, and what challenges we’re facing today? To share your thoughts and contribute to the…

Herman Melville’s “Scorching Irony”

[Brian Yothers, editor of our new edition of Melville’s “Benito Cereno,” shares his thoughts on the history of the story’s reception and its context.] In the blazing heart of one of the most famous speeches in the political and literary history of the United States, his 1852 oration “What to the Slave is the Fourth…

Working Together with Henry Mayhew: An Invitation

[Barbara Leckie and Janice Schroeder, editors of the new Broadview edition of London Labour and the London Poor, invite you to join in on the conversation about Mayhew in the 21st century. What does his work have to do with where we are, and what challenges we’re facing today? To share your thoughts and contribute to…

Mad Scientist’s Guide is mad indeed! A review by Stanwix von Stuffypants

I must confess to having been dubious concerning the “merits” of this so-called Mad-Scientist’s Guide to Composition from the moment I first espied its advertisement in the solemn pages of Canonical Literature quarterly; however, because I pride myself on staying abreast of what passes for “pedagogy” these days, not to mention what the youth are…

“another claimant for the … discovery of the sources of the White Nile”: Captain Singleton and Geographers Gone Wrong

[Manushag Powell, editor of the Broadview edition of Captain Singleton, shares a piece of history on the imagined African geography of Singleton and the reception of the novel and its cartography the 19th century.] One of the main points of interest in Daniel Defoe’s piratical Captain Singleton (1720) is its extensive description of an east-to-west…

“our greatest pleasures and our deepest fears:” On Reading Children’s Literature

[What follows below is an excerpt from the introduction for students in Reading Children’s Literature, Second Edition on the varied experiences that arise when studying children’s literature.] As we’ve noted, some readers worry that analyzing cultural texts interferes with pleasure, but we might also note how unsettling it is to be confused by a text or…

Editing The Great Irish Famine

[Karen Sonnelitter reflects upon her experience editing her book in the Broadview Sources Series, The Great Irish Famine.] The greatest challenge of producing an edited primary source collection on the Irish Potato Famine is choosing what to include. The Famine is perhaps the most well-studied topic in Irish history, and reducing it to a brief introduction…

On Still Learning to Write

[Laurie McMillan, author of Focus on Writing shares her thoughts on the process of learning to write.] One of my healthiest coping mechanisms is my ability to laugh at myself. I had plenty of occasion to do so as I worked on Focus on Writing: What College Students Want to Know for Broadview Press. This composition textbook…

Quest of the Holy Grail and Medieval Manuscripts

[Judith Shoaf, editor of our new edition of Quest of the Holy Grail, shares some tips from her experience finding medieval manuscripts online and incorporating images into her new Broadview Edition.] In researching this translation of the Old French Quest of the Holy Grail, I had the luxury of being able to consult, from the comfort of…

On The Piazza Tales and Its Literary Contemporaries

[Brian Yothers, editor of our new edition of Melville’s Piazza Tales shares his thoughts on reading the stories in their literary contexts.] We often read “Bartleby, the Scrivener,” Herman Melville’s most famous short story, as if it is detached from the literary history of its time. One of Melville’s earliest reviewers, however, noted important connections among…

The New Face of Broadview’s Jane Austen

We imagine that you would be hard pressed to find a university campus in North America where Jane Austen is not taught. Indeed, the Broadview editions that we offer of her novels are among the most popular books that we publish. Because our Austen editions were published over a wide span of years, the covers―while…

R. v. Machekequonabe – From Canadian Cases in the Philosophy of Law

What follows is a case from the fifth edition of Canadian Cases in the Philosophy of Law. This new edition includes many contemporary and historical cases, making it easy for students to compare historical court decisions such as the below to those from the present day. R. v. Machekequonabe Ontario Court of Appeal (1897) 28 O.R. 309…

Editing Frances E. W. Harper’s Iola Leroy

[Koritha Mitchell, editor of our new edition of Frances E. W. Harper’s Iola Leroy, shares her thoughts on editing the text.] I have taught Iola Leroy almost every year since I joined the faculty at Ohio State University twelve years ago, so when I finally decided to prepare a scholarly edition of it, I was…

Reflections on Philosophy and Math

Eric Steinhart, author of More Precisely: The Math You Need to Do Philosophy, shares his thoughts on the new edition of his book, and the practice of using math in philosophy. Philosophers are increasingly using mathematical tools to make their arguments and to construct their theories. Analytic philosophers have long used mathematics, but recently philosophers usually…

A Toast to a New Stamp Act Sourcebook

What better way to celebrate a victory than with a series of toasts. A group calling themselves the Sons of Liberty did just that on the occasion of the repeal of the Stamp Act. This document is included in Jonathan Mercantini’s newly published The Stamp Act of 1765, the second title to appear in the…

“avowedly a literary orgie:” A Contemporary Review of A Marriage Below Zero

The following is a review of A Marriage Below Zero published in Belford’s Magazine in June of 1889 upon the novel’s first publication. This review, among others, is featured in our new edition of A Marriage Below Zero, edited by Richard A. Kaye. In producing this book the writer, who wisely conceals his identity under an evident pseudonym, has touched…

The Socialist Circle of 1880’s London: Engels on A City Girl

The following is an excerpt from Appendix A of our recently published edition of Margaret Harkness’s A City Girl, in which Friedrich Engels responds to the novel. [The following letter from Friedrich Engels (1820–95) to Harkness about A City Girl has perhaps generated more concentrated attention from critics than the novel itself. Engels, the German-born philosopher…

On Editing Mary Shelley’s Mathilda

[Michelle Faubert, editor of our new edition of Mary Shelley’s Mathilda, shares her thoughts on editing the text.] Editing Mary Shelley’s Mathilda (1819; first published 1959) for Broadview Press has been hugely exciting for me, not least because I transcribed it from the manuscript. In 1959, Elizabeth Nitchie first transcribed Mathilda for publication from a…

Pedagogy and International Students

I thought I would write this week about the extraordinary growth over the past generation in the number of international students attending North American universities, the pedagogical challenges this growth has presented—and about one aspect of the latest edition of our Broadview Anthology of Expository Prose that represents a response to these challenges. Thirty years ago EAL*…