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Mandeville

William Godwin’s Mandeville was described as his best novel by Percy Shelley, who sent a copy to Lord Byron, and it was immediately recognized by its other admirers as a work of unique power. Written one year after the battle of Waterloo and set in an earlier revolutionary period between the execution of Charles I…

The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: Concise Volume B, 3e – Modified eBook International Edition

This modified eBook is intended for readers outside of the United States and Canada. If you are within the United States or Canada, please see the print and eBook options available on this page. For copyright reasons, some readings are omitted from this modified eBook. However, it includes 88% of the material available in the…

The Broadview Anthology of Social and Political Thought: From Machiavelli to Nietzsche – Modified Ebook Edition

This modified ebook version of The Broadview Anthology of Social and Political Thought: From Machiavelli to Nietzsche  includes 90% of the material available in the print version. See the “Contents” tab for the ebook’s table of contents, or click here to see a list comparing the print book’s contents to the ebook. This volume contains many…

The Broadview Anthology of British Literature Volume 4: The Age of Romanticism – Third Edition

In all six of its volumes The Broadview Anthology of British Literature presents British literature in a truly distinctive light. Fully grounded in sound literary and historical scholarship, the anthology takes a fresh approach to many canonical authors, and includes a wide selection of work by lesser-known writers. The anthology also provides wide-ranging coverage of…

Caleb Williams

William Godwin was one of the most popular novelists of the Romantic era; P.B. Shelley praised him, Byron drew heavily on his narrative style, and Mary Shelley, Godwin’s daughter, dedicated Frankenstein to him. Caleb Williams is the riveting account of a young man whose curiosity leads him to pry into a murder from the past.…

Memoirs of the Author of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

William Godwin’s memoir of his wife, Mary Wollstonecraft, marks a transition in Godwin’s philosophical development from extreme rationalism to the recognition of the moral importance of feeling and sympathy which was to energize his later writings. Memoirs also belongs to a tradition of biographical writing that sought to transform the consciousness of readers by using…

The Broadview Anthology of Literature of the Revolutionary Period 1770-1832

The selections from 132 authors in this anthology represent gender, social class, and racial and national origin as inclusively as possible, providing both greater context for canonical works and a sense of the era’s richness and diversity. In terms of genre, poetry, non-fiction prose, philosophy, educational writing, and prose fiction are included. Geographically, America, Canada,…

Revolutions in Romantic Literature

This concise Broadview anthology of primary source materials is unique in its focus on Romantic literature and the ways in which the period itself was characterized by wide-ranging, self-conscious debates about the meaning of literature. It includes materials that are not available in other Romantic literature anthologies. The anthology is organized into thirteen sections that…

Mathilda

Mary Shelley’s Mathilda, the story of one woman’s existential struggle after learning of her father’s desire for her, has been identified as Shelley’s most important work after Frankenstein. The two texts share many characteristics, besides authorship and contemporaneity: both concern parental abandonment; both contribute to the Gothic form through themes of incest, insanity, suicidality, monstrosity,…

The Idea of Being Free

Mary Hays (1759-1843) is often best remembered for her early revolutionary novels The Memoirs of Emma Courtney and The Victim of Prejudice. In this collection, however, Gina Luria Walker reveals the extraordinary range of Hays’s oeuvre. The selections are mainly from Hays’s non-fiction writings, including letters, life-writing, political commentary, and essays. The extracts demonstrate her…

Nature and Art

Nature and Art commands a central place in the history of the English Jacobin novel. Published in 1796, the story explores the opposition between the upbringing and actions of Henry Norwynne, an unspoiled “child of nature” who has been reared without books on an African island, and the corrupt conduct of his aristocratic older cousin,…

Fleetwood

Fleetwood is a pivotal novel of early English Romanticism and a powerful critique of the Romantic emotionalism being spread across Europe in Rousseau’s name. Godwin’s “new man of feeling” chronicles the impact of his “natural” education in the wilds of Wales, and his behavior allows Godwin to draw attention to an array of contemporary social…

St. Leon

Set in Europe during the Protestant Reformation and first published in 1799, St. Leon tells the story of an impoverished aristocrat who obtains the philosopher’s stone and the elixir of immortality. In this philosophical fable, endless riches and immortal life prove to be curses rather than gifts and transform St. Leon into an outcast. William…

Romantic Literature

ROMANTIC LITERATURE Moral Tales(18th C and early 19th C) Maria Edgeworth, Hannah More, Amelia Opie Jane Austen’s Manuscript Works (18th C) Sense and Sensibility (1811) Jane Austen Pride and Prejudice, second edition (1813) Jane Austen Mansfield Park (1814) Jane Austen Emma (1816) Jane Austen Persuasion (1816 / 1818) Jane Austen Northanger Abbey, second edition (1818)…

Hermsprong

Robert Bage’s Hermsprong satirizes English society of the 1790s targeting, in particular, corrupt clergymen, grasping lawyers and wicked aristocrats. The protagonist, a European raised among Native Americans, visits Europe and is dismayed by what he encounters. While such satire might seem conventional enough, Hermsprong is distinguished from other political novels of the period by its…

Memoirs of Emma Courtney

In November of 1795, after William Godwin requested a sketch of Mary Hays’ life, she arrived at the idea of Memoirs of Emma Courtney. Godwin followed up his request with a “hint” that a fictional exploration of the painful experience she had undergone in her relationship with William Frend might help her to come to…

Letters Written during a Short Residence in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark

“The art of travelling is only a branch of the art of thinking,” Mary Wollstonecraft wrote in one of her many reviews of works of travel writing. A Short Residence is her own travel memoir. In a series of letters addressed to an unnamed lover, the work narrates Wollstonecraft’s journey through Scandinavia in 1795, on…

The Infernal Quixote

The Infernal Quixote (1801) is an enjoyable comic romp in which Charles Lucas engages directly with the most pressing political issues of his day and establishes himself as one of the most forthright of all the anti-Jacobin writers. Dealing with many aspects of the debates that raged around the writings of Burke, Paine, Wollstonecraft, Godwin,…

Nightmare Abbey

This 1818 novel is set in a former abbey whose owner, Christopher Glowry, is host to visitors who enjoy his hospitality and engage in endless debate. Among these guests are figures recognizable to Peacock’s contemporaries, including characters based on Lord Byron and Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Mr. Glowry’s son Scythrop (also modeled on a famous Romantic,…

Lodore

Beset by jealousy over an admirer of his wife’s, Lord Lodore has come with his daughter Ethel to the American wilderness; his wife Cornelia, meanwhile, has remained with her controlling mother in England. When he finally brings himself to attempt a return, Lodore is killed en route in a duel. Ethel does return to England,…

The Daughter of Adoption

John Thelwall’s The Daughter of Adoption: A Tale of Modern Times is a witty and wide-ranging work in which the picaresque and sentimental novel of the eighteenth century confronts the revolutionary ideas and forms of the Romantic period. Thelwall puts his two main characters, the conflicted English gentleman Henry Montfort and the Creole Seraphina Parkinson,…

Laon and Cythna

Laon and Cythna is one of Percy Bysshe Shelley’s most celebrated, and most controversial, literary works. At once philosophical treatise and love story, it follows the adventures of a pair of siblings who lead a political uprising based on socialist, feminist, and ecological ideals, only to be executed for treason. In its own time Shelley’s…

Edgar Allan Poe: Selected Poetry and Tales

Edgar Allan Poe’s stories and poems are among the most haunting and indelible in American literature, but critics for decades persisted in seeing Poe as an anomaly, or even an anachronism. His works, with their bizarrely motivated characters and mysterious settings, did not seem to be a part of the literature of early nineteenth-century America.…

The Father and Daughter with Dangers of Coquetry

The Father and Daughter was one of the most widely read novels of the early nineteenth century, captivating readers with its pathos and melodrama. It tells the story of Agnes Fitzhenry, whose seduction by the libertine Clifford causes her father to descend into madness. Rooted in the social conditions of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century…