The Broadview Guide to Writing – Revised Canadian Sixth Edition
9781554813353.jpg
  • Publication Date: December 28, 2016
  • ISBN: 9781554813353 / 1554813352
  • 736 pages; 5" x 8"

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The Broadview Guide to Writing – Revised Canadian Sixth Edition

  • Publication Date: December 28, 2016
  • ISBN: 9781554813353 / 1554813352
  • 736 pages; 5" x 8"

Increasingly, writing handbooks are seen as over-produced and overpriced. One stands out: The Broadview Guide to Writing is published in an elegant but simple format, and sells for roughly half the price of its fancier-looking competitors. That does not change with the new edition; what does change and stay up-to-date is the book’s contents. For the sixth edition the coverage of APA, Chicago, and CSE styles of documentation has been substantially expanded; the MLA section has now been fully revised to take into account all the 2016 changes. Also expanded is coverage of academic argument; of writing and critical thinking; of writing about literature, of paragraphing; of how to integrate quoted material into one’s own work; of balance and parallelism; and of issues of gender, race, religion etc. in writing. The chapter “Seeing and Meaning: Reading (and Writing About) Visual Images” is entirely new to the sixth edition.

Comments

The Broadview Guide remains the most readable writing guide available—at any price. It’s the only usage guide I’ve ever actually read for fun. Moreover, it’s sensible, and it’s complete. The authors assume nothing, but they don’t condescend. … The 6th edition gives more space to the problems of gender, race, and class-biased language; most guides don’t direct enough of our attention here. The new chapter on visual literacy is also good—an interesting group of paintings & photographs along with a set of clear, concrete ways to ‘read’ them.” — Jacky Bolding, University of the Fraser Valley

“… an excellent choice.… The expanded coverage of the sixth edition [makes] this not only a comprehensive writing guide, but also a valuable introduction to communication and critical thinking in today’s academic world. I will be recommending this text to students at all levels.” — Maria DiCenzo, Wilfrid Laurier University

“[The] reference sections on grammar and usage … cover everything I would ever point out in student writing.… The section on MLA style covers pretty much everything anyone needs to know about how to deploy this system of documentation.… The sections on academic writing are [also] very good.” — Bruce Greenfield, Dalhousie University

“In a market replete with writing guides, this practical book stands out…. The [Broadview] Guide … re-energizes this pedagogical field by providing clear and concise explanations supported by examples.” — Anne Quéma, Acadia University

“[The new] section on how language both reflects and shapes reality … is thought-provoking and sensitive.… Overall, the book is comprehensive, balanced, and engaging. I enjoyed reading it, and I rarely say that about handbooks and guides to writing. I’m sure students will find this book helpful and inspiring.” — Candace Fertile, Camosun College

  • HOW TO USE THIS BOOK AND ITS COMPANION WEBSITE
  • PREFACE TO THE SIXTH CANADIAN EDITION
  • INTRODUCTION
    • THE WRITING PROCESS
      Voice Work
      • Attitude
        Audience
        Purpose: From Topic to Thesis Statement
    • Before the Writing Starts: Essential Activities
      • Reading and Note-Taking
        Mapping
        Writer’s Block
        Dialogue
    • Logical Fluency: The Nature of Argument
      • Argument Structure, Paragraphing, and Topic Sentences
        Organizing Paragraphs in Longer Essays
        Your Arguments, Others’ Arguments
    • Logical Fluency: Modes of Writing, Modes of Thought
      • Elaboration and Repetition
        Modes of Thought/Modes of Writing
        • Narration
          Classification
          Generalization and Abstraction
          Cause, Reasons, Explanations
          Combining Modes of Thought
      • Reasoning
        Subordination
        Connectives
    • Stylistic Fluency
      • Diction
        Figures Of Speech
        Syntax
        Rhythm
        Voice
        Tone
    • Revision and Proofreading
      Collaboration and Research
      • Approaches to Research
        Citation
        Criticism
        Examinations and In-class Essays
    • BASIC GRAMMAR: AN OUTLINE
      Parts of Speech
      • Nouns
        Pronouns
        Articles
        Adjectives
        Verbs
        Adverbs
        Prepositions
        Conjunctions and Conjunctive Adverbs

      Parts of Sentences

      • Subject
        Object
        Predicate
        Clause
        Phrase
        Types of Clauses
        Types of Subordinate Clauses
        Types of Phrases
        Distinguishing Phrases and Clauses
        Parts of Speech and Parts of the Sentence
    • WRITING GRAMMATICALLY
      Right and Wrong in Writing
      Verbs Problems
      • Verbs and Verb Tense Difficulties
        • The Infinitive
          The Simple Present Tense
          The Present Progressive (or Continuous) Tense
          The Simple Past Tense
          The Past Progressive (or Continuous) Tense
          The Simple Future Tense
          The Future Progressive (or Continuous) Tense
          The Perfect Tenses
          The Present Perfect Tense
          The Past Perfect Tense
          The Future Perfect Tense
          Other Tenses
      • Mood: Indicative, Imperative, and Subjunctive
        • The Conditional
          The Past Conditional
      • Active and Passive Voice
        Dangling Constructions
        • Dangling Participles and Infinitives
      • Sequence of Tenses
        Irregular or Difficult Verbs
    • Infinitives, Gerunds, Objects: “To Be or Not to Be?”
      Preposition Problems “Up With Which I will Not Put”
      Nouns and Pronouns: Singular Difficulties
      Pronouns: Who Cares About Whom?
      Part of Speech Confusion: A Question of Principle?
    • WORDS
      Word Order Problems
      One Word or Two?
      Word Meanings: Are Cars Ever Stationery?
      Usage: Word Conventions
    • PUTTING IDEAS TOGETHER
      Paragraphing
      • In Narration
        In Description
        In Persuasion or Argument
    • Argument
      • Fallacies and Faulty Arguments
    • Joining Words
      • Words to Connect Ideas That Are Opposed to Each Other
        Words to Join Linked or Supporting Ideas
        Words Used to Introduce Causes or Reasons
        Words Used to Introduce Results or Conclusions
        Words Used to Express Purpose
        Words Used to Introduce Examples
        Words Used to Introduce Alternatives
        Words Used to Show Degree or Extent
        That and Which
        Words Used to Make Comparisons
        Other Joining Words and Expressions
    • Sentence Combining
      • Combining
        • Joining Kernels
          Embedding Kernels
          Abbreviated Kernels Joined as Absolute Phrases
          Abbreviated Kernels Embedded as Verb and Noun Phrases
          Abbreviated Kernels Embedded as Modifiers
      • Combining and Recombining
        • Combining Several Kernels into a Single Sentence
          “De-Combining” and Recombining
      • Help with Some Grammatical Errors: Two More Examples
        • Dangling Modifiers
          Syntactic Ambiguity
      • Help with Reading Challenging Texts
        Gaining Awareness of Writing Style
    • STYLE
      Slang and Informal English
      Wordiness
      Writing By Computer
      • Spell-check and Grammar-check
        Observing Online Etiquette
        Point-form Online Etiquette
        Copyright and the Web
    • Business Writing
      How to Be Good with Words: Styles of Writing When Considering Gender, Race and Ethnicity, Class, Religion, Sexual Orientation, and Disability
      • Bias-free Vocabulary: A Short List
    • ACADEMIC WRITING
      Writing about Literature / Writing About Texts
      • The Meanings of Texts
        Meaning and Form in Literature
        Writing about Texts: Particular Problems
    • Writing About Science
      • Structure of the Research Paper
        Scientific Tone and Stylistic Choices
        The First Person and the Active Voice
    • Across the Disciplines: Different Subjects, Different Styles of Academic Writing
      • Anthropology
        Art History
        Biology
        Business and Commerce
        Chemistry
        Economics
        Engineering
        English Studies
        History
        Medicine and Health Studies
        Philosophy
        Physics
        Politics
        Psychology
        Sociology
    • SEEING AND MEANING
    • EAL: For Those Whose Native Language Is Not English
      • Frequently Used Non-count Nouns
    • PUNCTUATION, FORMAT, AND SPELLING
      Punctuation
      • The Period
        The Ellipsis
        The Comma
        The Question Mark
        The Exclamation Mark
        The Semicolon
        The Colon
        The Hyphen
        The Dash
        Parentheses
        Square Brackets
        The Apostrophe
        Quotation Marks
        Single Quotation Marks
    • Direct and Indirect Speech
      • Direct Speech
        Indirect Speech
    • Format and Spelling
      • Capitalization
        Abbreviations
    • Spelling
      • Spelling and Sound
    • DOCUMENTATION AND RESEARCH
      Avoiding Plagiarism—and Choosing When and What to Quote
      Citation and Documentation
      • Incorporating Sources
        • Summarizing
          Paraphrasing
          Quoting Directly
          Formatting Quotations
          • Short Prose Quotations
            Long Prose Quotations
            Verse Quotations
            Quotations within Quotations
        • Adding to or Deleting from a Quotation
          • Using square brackets to add to a quotation
            Using an ellipsis to delete from a quotation
            Integrating Quotations
            Avoiding “dumped” quotations
        • Signal Phrases
    • MLA STYLE
    • About In-Text Citations
    • About Works Cited: MLA Core Elements
    • Examples
    • MLA Style Example Essay
    • APA STYLE
      Incorporating Sources in APA Style
      • Summarizing
        Paraphrasing
        Quoting Directly
        Signal Phrases
        About In-text Citations
        About References
        APA Style Sample Essay
    • CHICAGO STYLE
      About Chicago Style
      • Chicago Style Style Sample
    • CSE STYLE
      • CSE Style Sample
    • APPENDIX 1: CORRECTION KEY
    • APPENDIX 2: SOME NATIONAL VARIATIONS
    • APPENDIX 3: ESSAY CHECKLIST
    • PERMISSIONS ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    • INDEX

    Doug Babington was until recently Director of the Writing Centre at Queen’s University, and the author of articles both on writing and on literature.

    Don LePan’s other books include The Broadview Pocket Glossary of Literary Terms (2013) and Rising Stories: A Novel (2015).

    Maureen Okun is a professor in both the English and the Liberal Studies Departments at Vancouver Island University; her most recent book is an edition of Sir Thomas Malory’s Le Morte Darthur: Selections (2014).

    Nora Ruddock is Developmental Editor at Broadview Press and co-author of The Broadview Pocket Guide to Citation and Documentation 2e (2016).

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