The Broadview Anthology of Expository Prose: Second Edition
  • Publication Date: May 25, 2011
  • ISBN: 9781554810376 / 155481037X
  • 768 pages; 6" x 9"
Exam Copy

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The Broadview Anthology of Expository Prose: Second Edition

  • Publication Date: May 25, 2011
  • ISBN: 9781554810376 / 155481037X
  • 768 pages; 6" x 9"

A substantial selection of classic essays allows readers to trace the history of the essay from Swift to Woolf and Orwell and beyond. A selection of the finest of contemporary essays—from Witold Rybcynski to David Sedaris and Elizabeth Kolbert—provides a broad sample of the genre in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. The academic essays begin with classic selections from such writers as Darwin and Charles Lyell, but the emphasis is on recent decades. Emphasized as well are academic papers or essays that have been especially influential or controversial, from Luis and Walter Alvarez’s suggestion that an asteroid caused the extinction of the dinosaurs to Judith Rich Harris’s argument that the influence of peers may be at least as influential in the formation of personality as that of parents.

Works of different lengths, levels of difficulty and subject matter are all represented, as are narrative, descriptive and persuasive essays. Also included in the text is a range of questions and suggestions for discussion. The text selections are numbered by paragraph for ready reference.

Added to the second edition are new selections by Malcolm Gladwell, Doris Lessing, Eric Schlosser, Binyavanga Wainaina, and over twenty others. This new edition also provides pairings of informal and academic articles that address the same topic, allowing readers to consider contrasting approaches.

Comments

The Broadview Anthology of Expository Prose is an excellent resource. Not only does the text contain an array of stimulating literary works and thought-provoking persuasive pieces, but it also includes useful questions that lead to true discussions, rather than simple answers. My students’ responses to the readings have sparked meaningful and productive conversations about culture, education, and our ways of viewing the world. To my delight, at the end of a typical meeting we are left with even more questions than when we began. This text fosters students’ growth as inquisitive, critical readers and opens the doorway to future academic work.” — Alixandra V. Krzemien, Canisius College

“What a wonderful and insightful collection of essays. My writing courses improved by leaps and bounds when I adopted the first edition. … [W]ith a diverse and engaging range of essays, The Broadview Anthology of Expository Prose challenges writers to read beyond the purview of their experience and knowledge so that their writing can consider and cross more horizons. This collection invites students into serious academic discourse via groundbreaking essays by prominent and influential voices from within and without academia; the second edition will prepare writers to understand how any topic or discipline cultivates networks of dialogue across popular, lyrical, scholarly, experimental, and theoretical styles. Don’t be surprised when students read more than the assigned material from The Broadview Anthology, as was the case when I adopted the first edition for my courses; the accessible organization and appeal of this book make it a useful resource for ongoing learning and research.” — Beth Staley, West Virginia University

“The editors of The Broadview Anthology of Expository Prose have managed to make significant improvements to what was already an above-average prose anthology. One of the things I appreciated about the first edition was the diversity of authors, topics, perspectives, and styles; the second edition introduces a wider range of contemporary voices through the addition of twenty new essays … from writers ranging from Barack Obama to Jonah Lehrer to David Sedaris. A particular strength of the new edition is the inclusion of paired articles (two articles on the same topic but directed toward different audiences), which provides students with the opportunity to explore the concepts of audience, voice, and purpose in writing.” — Lisa Salem-Wiseman, Humber College

“[A]ccessible to first and second-year university students, [the essays in this volume are] relevant as prompts for writing and discussion, and lend themselves to rhetorical analysis. Welcome additions to the second edition include selections from a broader range of academic disciplines (including works on engineering and neuroscience topics) and paired essays providing divergent perspectives on the same topic. While updating content to reflect current issues (Barack Obama’s 2008 speech on race relations “A More Perfect Union” has now made its way into the anthology, along with Binyavanga Wainaina’s wonderfully satirical “How to Write about Africa”), Broadview has retained excerpts from classic texts such as Milgram’s Behavioral Study of Obedience and Darwin’s On The Origin of Species.” — Suzanne James, University of British Columbia

“I’m happy to see that the new edition of The Broadview Anthology of Expository Prose has included a selection of newer articles that, on top of the articles maintained from the older edition, will work well in a course on critical reading and writing. Articles such as Binyavanga Wainaina’s “How to Write about Africa” and Malcolm Gladwell’s “None of the Above: What I.Q. Doesn’t Tell You About Race” provide material that is both current and controversial, making it perfect for class discussions focused on the critical expression of relevant issues. The [editors offer] insightful questions at the end of each article and have chosen readings carefully—[this is an anthology] … that can be used beneficially in class discussion and as the basis for written assignments.” — Louise Nichols, Université de Moncton

“Broadview has surpassed itself. This eclectic anthology represents the essay as a supple form of expression, and its subject as all that pertains to the human condition. Invaluable for the classroom, this collection will also challenge, amuse, provoke, and console the general reader.” — Susanna Egan, University of British Columbia

The Broadview Anthology of Expository Prose is one of the best essay anthologies I have seen. The remarkable diversity of the essays covers an impressive range of authors, styles, topics, and viewpoints. Included are essays from the humanities, the sciences, and the social sciences; scholarly essays, literary essays, and popular essays; traditional essays and contemporary ones; short essays and long ones; essays in a wide range of tones and of voices, by men and women from a wide range of backgrounds. An added bonus is the historical range of prose styles from the seventeenth to the twenty-first centuries. The quality of the essays also deserves high praise; again and again these readings demonstrate how the most common questions may provoke uncommon insights. Many selections have a sharp edge but they challenge a reader’s mindset without being confrontational. The topics make one take notice; the essays then lead the reader through the complexities of analysis. This anthology of significant, incisive, diverse essays should make a significant contribution to the recognition of the essay as a vitally important genre—and of essay writing as a vitally important literary and argumentative art.” — Paul D. Farkas, Metropolitan State College

PREFACE
CONTENTS BY SUBJECT
CONTENTS BY RHETORICAL CATEGORY

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

FRANCIS BACON

  • Of Studies

JOHN DONNE

  • from For Whom This Bell Tolls (Meditation XVII)

MARGARET CAVENDISH

JONATHAN SWIFT

  • A Modest Proposal

SAMUEL JOHNSON

MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT

  • To M. Talleyrand-Périgord, Late Bishop of Autun

CHARLES LYELL

  • from The Principles of Geology

HARRIET MARTINEAU

HENRY DAVID THOREAU

  • Civil Disobedience

GEORGE COPWAY

CHARLES DARWIN

  • from On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection

GEORGE ELIOT

MARK TWAIN

  • A River Pilot Looks at the Mississippi

ELIZA M.

  • Account of Cape Town, 1863

LADY AGNES MACDONALD

  • By Car and Cowcatcher

OSCAR WILDE

  • The New Aesthetic

JANE ADDAMS

  • On Halsted Street

W.E.B. DU BOIS

  • A Mild Suggestion

STEPHEN LEACOCK

WINSTON CHURCHILL

  • from Blood, Toil, Tears and Sweat
    from We Shall Fight on the Beaches
    from This Was Their Finest Hour

VIRGINIA WOOLF

  • Professions for Women
    The Death of the Moth

GEORGE ORWELL

  • Shooting an Elephant
    Politics and the English Language

STANLEY MILGRAM

  • from Behavioral Study of Obedience

RAYMOND WILLIAMS

  • Correctness and the English Language

MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.

  • Letter from Birmingham Jail

GROUCHO MARX

  • Dinner with My Celebrated Pen Pal T.S. Eliot

MARGARET LAURENCE

  • Where the World Began

ROLAND BARTHES

  • The World of Wrestling

ALDEN NOWLAN

JANET FLANNER

  • Pablo Picasso
    Mme. Marie Curie (1866-1934)

MARVIN HARRIS

  • Pig Lovers and Pig Haters

FRAN LEBOWITZ

  • Children: Pro or Con?

PETER SINGER

  • Speciesism and the Equality of Animals

ADRIENNE RICH

  • Taking Women Students Seriously
    Invisibility in Academe

SUSAN WOLF

MIKE ROYKO

  • Another Accolade for Charter Arms Corp.

LUIS W. ALVAREZ, WALTER ALVAREZ, FRANK ASARO, AND HELEN V. MICHEL

  • Extraterrestrial Cause for the Cretaceous-Tertiary Extinction

ELIZABETH KOLBERT

  • The Sixth Extinction?

ALICE MUNRO

  • What Is Real?

ROBERT DARNTON

  • Workers Revolt: The Great Cat Massacre of the Rue Saint-Séverin

ELAINE SHOWALTER

  • Representing Ophelia: Women, Madness, and the Responsibilities of Feminist Criticism

STEPHEN JAY GOULD

  • Entropic Homogeneity Isn’t Why No One Hits .400 Any More

NGUGI WA THIONG’O

  • from Decolonising the Mind

W.H. GRAHAM

STEVIE CAMERON

ANATOLE BROYARD

  • Intoxicated by My Illness

EMILY MARTIN

  • The Egg and the Sperm: How Science Has Constructed a Romance Based on Stereotypical Male-Female Roles

JAMAICA KINCAID

  • On Seeing England for the First Time

DIONNE BRAND

  • On Poetry

URSULA FRANKLIN

  • Silence and the Notion of the Commons

ROBERT D. PUTNAM

  • Bowling Alone: America’s Declining Social Capital

ALICE BECK KEHOE

  • Transcribing Insima, a Blackfoot “Old Lady”

THOMAS HURKA

JUDITH RICH HARRIS

  • Where Is the Child’s Environment? A Group Socialization Theory of Development

PHILIP GOUREVITCH

  • from We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed with Our Families

GWYNNE DYER

LARISSA LAI

  • Political Animals and the Body of History

WITOLD RYBCZYNSKI

  • One Good Turn: Why the Robertson Screwdriver Is the Biggest Little Invention of the Twentieth Century

TIM DEVLIN

  • Does Working for Welfare Work?

NAOMI KLEIN

  • The Swoosh

MARGARET ATWOOD

  • First Job

MARK BEEMAN, JOHN KOUNIOS. ET AL.

  • Neural Activity When People Solve Verbal Problems with Insight

JONAH LEHRER

  • The Eureka Hunt

BINYAVANGA WAINAINA

  • How to Write about Africa

DORIS LESSING

  • On Not Winning the Nobel Prize

MALCOLM GLADWELL

ADAM GOPNIK

  • The Corrections

ERIC SCHLOSSER

  • Penny Foolish: Why Does Burger King Insist on Shortchanging Tomato Pickers?

MARGARET WENTE

  • The Charitable and the Cheap: Which One Are You?

FABRIZIO BENEDETTI, ANTONELLA POLLO, AND LUANA COLLOCA

  • Opioid-Mediated Placebo Responses Boost Pain Endurance and Physical Performance: Is It Doping in Sport Competitions?

DAVID SEDARIS

  • This Old House

DANIEL HEATH JUSTICE

  • Fear of a Changeling Moon

BARACK OBAMA

  • A More Perfect Union

IRENE PEPPERBERG, JENNIFER VICINAY, AND PATRICK CAVANAGH

  • Processing of the Müller-Lyer Illusion by a Grey Parrot

IRENE PEPPERBERG

  • from Alex & Me: How a Scientist and a Parrot Uncovered a Hidden World of Animal Intelligence—and Formed a Deep
    Bond in the Process

WILLIAM F. BAKER, D. STANTON KORISTA, AND LAWRENCE C. NOVAK

  • Engineering the World’s Tallest—Burj Dubai

PEGGY ORENSTEIN

  • Stop Your Search Engines

NEAL MCLEOD

  • Cree Poetic Discourse

MICHAEL HARRIS

  • The Unrepentant Whore

JAMES SALTER

  • The Art of the Ditch

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
INDEX

The instructor site has additional questions and exercises as well as background material on certain essays.

The student companion site has additional readings and interactive writing exercises. An access code to the website is included with all new copies. If you purchased a used copy or are missing your passcode for this site, please click here to purchase a code online.